lucernal

Of or pertaining to a lamp or other artificial light.

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There is no night so dark that the cities’ lucernal glow cannot be seen from the space station.

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Credit: NASA Earth Observatory/NOAA NGDC

love apple

noun
archaic
A tomato.
‘The tomato used to be called the love apple and this is nothing to do with its passionate color or suggestive shape.’

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One hopes some local love apple plants survived the deluge of hurricane Isaias.

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Secret Sources

We know the river at its end, flowing majestically through the delta, adding fresh to the salty sea.

Tributaries abound, adding their tumbling contributions over rocky runs, dams and falls.

Each of those is fed by a reverse-branched tree of creeks, streams and trickles

All the way back to a thousand pop-up starts which few will ever see.

gîte

/ʒiːt/ /ʒit/
noun
A furnished holiday house in France, typically in a rural district.

Origin
French, from Old French giste; related to gésir ‘to lie’.

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It may be unfair to cheat,
But I still think that it’s neat
To accomplish this tricky feat
With a new word like gîte.

With letters just four
No search (which needs more)
Can be had; that’s for sure.
As a result, we skip that chore.

Straight on to the sample
Even though weak example
Never had cash that was ample
So through France could not trample.

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xyphoid

/ˈzɪfɔɪd/
adjective
technical
Sword-shaped.

Origin
Mid 18th century from Greek xiphoeidēs, from xiphos ‘sword’.

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Using a process known only to himself, after becoming a knight, Sir Rodney named his sword “Xyphoid“.

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guddle

/ˈɡʌd(ə)l/
verb
[no object] Scottish
1 Fish with the hands by groping under the stones or banks of a stream.
1.1 with object Catch (a fish) by guddling.

Origin
Mid 17th century of unknown origin.

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I suspect guddling at the stream’s bank is typically less successful than using a dry fly.

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fraught

/frɔːt/
adjective
1 fraught with (of a situation or course of action) filled with or likely to result in (something undesirable)
2 Causing or affected by anxiety or stress.

Origin
Late Middle English, ‘laden, equipped’, past participle of obsolete fraught ‘load with cargo’, from Middle Dutch vrachten, from vracht ‘ship’s cargo’. Compare with freight.

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Marvin mostly managed life’s baggage, and diligently tried tried to hide it in times fraught with stress. Unfortunately, recent events were rife with those times.

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Life can be fraught
With negative thought
Though you know we ought
Have the joy we’ve sought.
Please understand, it can’t be bought.