artistry

artistry

/ˈɑːtɪstri/
noun
mass noun
Creative skill or ability.

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At best, human artistry is a pedestrian approximation of nature’s work.

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absolve

absolve

/əbˈzɒlv/
verb
[with object]
1 Declare (someone) free from guilt, obligation, or punishment.
1.1 (in church use) give absolution for (a sin)

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin absolvere ‘set free, acquit’, from ab- ‘from’ + solvere ‘loosen’.

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Okay, Joe, put down that smoking gun next to the dead person you just shot. I absolve you. Go on your way. Have a nice day.

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thicket

thicket

/ˈθɪkɪt/
noun
A dense group of bushes or trees.

Origin
Old English thiccet (see thick, -et).

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The real trick is how a male moose copes with the copse AKA, the thicket. Make your own path!

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proffer

proffer

/ˈprɒfə/
verb
[with object]
Hold out or put forward (something) to someone for acceptance.
noun
literary
An offer or proposal.

Origin
Middle English from Anglo-Norman French proffrir, from Latin pro- ‘before’ + offerre ‘to offer’.

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Bill proffered his dog some food. Dog, of course, was happy about it.

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stockpile

stockpile

/ˈstɒkpʌɪl/
noun
A large accumulated stock of goods or materials, especially one held in reserve for use at a time of shortage or other emergency.
verb
[with object]
Accumulate a large stock of (goods or materials)

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When an individual stockpiles things, it is often called hoarding.

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wondrous

wondrous

/ˈwʌndrəs/
adjective
literary
Inspiring a feeling of wonder or delight; marvellous.
adverb
archaic as submodifier
Marvellously; wonderfully.

Origin
Late 15th century alteration of obsolete wonders (adjective and adverb), genitive of wonder, on the pattern of marvellous.

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To eliminate recriminating fights
And other such terrible blights,
Limit your wondrous delights
To three consecutive nights.

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