mannerism

mannerism

/ˈmanərɪz(ə)m/
noun
1 A habitual gesture or way of speaking or behaving.
1.1 Psychiatry An ordinary gesture or expression that becomes abnormal through exaggeration or repetition.
2 mass noun – Excessive use of a distinctive style in art, literature, or music.
3 (also Mannerism)
mass noun A style of 16th-century Italian art preceding the Baroque, characterized by distortions in scale and perspective and the use of bright, often lurid colours. It is particularly associated with the work of Parmigianino, Pontormo, Vasari, and the later Michelangelo.

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Bob was often accused of expressing himself with a mannerism, perhaps in a passive/aggressive way, through an exaggerated shrug.

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delicious

delicious

/dɪˈlɪʃəs/
adjective
1 Highly pleasant to the taste.
1.1 Delightful.

Origin
Middle English (also in the sense ‘characterized by sensuous indulgence’): via Old French from late Latin deliciosus, from Latin deliciae (plural) ‘delight, pleasure’.

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Recipes reveal resplendent riches
Tasty tarts, tremendous treats
Delectable, delightful, delicious dishes
Egregiously elegant, extravagant eats.

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brilliant

brilliant

/ˈbrɪlj(ə)nt/
adjective
1 (of light or colour) very bright.
2 Exceptionally clever or talented.
2.1 Outstanding; impressive.
3 British informal Excellent; marvellous.
as exclamation ‘‘Brilliant!’ he declared excitedly’
noun
A diamond of brilliant cut.

Origin
Late 17th century from French brillant ‘shining’, present participle of briller, from Italian brillare, probably from Latin beryllus (see beryl).

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The dawn now past was brilliant. Clouds dominate in advance of forecast snow.

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dainty

dainty

/ˈdeɪnti/
adjective daintier, daintiest
1 Delicately small and pretty.
1.1 (of a person) delicate and graceful in build or movement.
1.2 (of food) particularly good to eat and served in a small portion.
2 Fastidious, especially concerning food.
noun dainties
Something good to eat; a delicacy.

Origin
Middle English (as noun): from Old French daintie, deintie ‘choice morsel, pleasure’, from Latin dignitas ‘worthiness or beauty’, from dignus ‘worthy’.

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Doreen, daintiest damsel
Killed her prize pig
So she could ham, sell.
A small silly, not big.

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brawn

brawn

/brɔːn/
noun
mass noun
Physical strength in contrast to intelligence.

Origin
Middle English from Old French braon ‘fleshy part of the leg’, of Germanic origin; related to German Braten ‘roast meat’.

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Bodybuilders are judged almost exclusively on their brawn.

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intoxicated

intoxicated

/ɪnˈtɒksɪkeɪtɪd/
adjective
Drunk or under the influence of drugs.

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Bob’s work was just belated.
He adamantly stated.
Though his skills may be overrated,
He denies he was intoxicated.

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avow

avow

/əˈvaʊ/
verb
reporting verb
Assert or confess openly.
with clause ‘he avowed that he had voted Labour in every election’
with object ‘he avowed his change of faith’

Origin
Middle English (in the senses ‘acknowledge, approve’ and ‘vouch for’): from Old French avouer ‘acknowledge’, from Latin advocare ‘summon in defence’ (see avouch).

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I avow that this word is being posted late for the second day in a row.

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doughy

doughy

/ˈdəʊi/
adjective doughier, doughiest
1 (of food) having a thick, malleable consistency.
1.1 (of a person) pale and rather fat.

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Joe had plenty of loot
Though he rarely wore a suit.
A little too long, his hair he let grow.
And his belly was doughy, you know.

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