stroppy

Word of the Day

stroppy

Pronunciation /ˈstrɒpi/
adjective, stroppier, stroppiest
informal British
Bad-tempered and argumentative.

Origin
1950s perhaps an abbreviation of obstreperous.

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Stan is severely stroppy
When his staff’s work is sloppy.
But his temper doesn’t improve their work.
They all just think that he’s a jerk.

tractable

Word of the Day

tractable

Pronunciation /ˈtraktəb(ə)l/
adjective
1 (of a person) easy to control or influence.
1.1 (of a situation or problem) easy to deal with.

Origin
Early 16th century from Latin tractabilis, from tractare ‘to handle’ (see tractate).

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I appreciate all the efforts made to make algebra tractable for me. Those efforts were applied too early for me. Time, and mental maturity, was the eventual cure.

indemnity

Word of the Day

indemnity

Pronunciation /ɪnˈdɛmnɪti/
noun indemnities
mass noun
1 Security or protection against a loss or other financial burden.
1.1 Security against or exemption from legal liability for one’s actions.
1.2 count noun A sum of money paid as compensation, especially one paid by a country defeated in war as a condition of peace.

Origin
Late Middle English from French indemnite, from late Latin indemnitas, from indemnis ‘unhurt, free from loss’.

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Insurance is an ordinary person’s indemnity against disaster. In practice, few are made whole.

sepulchral

Word of the Day

sepulchral

Pronunciation /sɪˈpʌlkr(ə)l/
adjective
1 Relating to a tomb or interment.
1.1 Gloomy; dismal.

Origin
Early 17th century from French sépulchral or Latin sepulchralis, from sepulcrum (see sepulchre).

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Sunny

There was very little room
To stand within the gloom
Of shadow by the tomb
‘Cause it was almost noon.

A Fine Day

A rising sun
Portends some fun,
A day of play,
We’ll jump and run.

More calm at noon
We’ll enjoy a boon
Of picnic lunch
And hum a tune.

Later on, a chance,
We may jointly glance
And then wind up
Hugging in a dance.

insinuendo

Word of the Day

insinuendo

Pronunciation /ɪnˌsɪnjʊˈɛndəʊ/
noun plural noun insinuendos
informal, mainly humorous
another term for insinuation

Origin
Late 19th century blend of insinuation and innuendo.

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Alec dropped so many lame insinuendos about Mark at the party that, by the end, everyone congratulated Mark for keeping so much of Alec’s attention.

A note about process.
Almost all of these WotD illustrations are clipart. Some days, like yesterday, the clipart is brand new. Today, I took the easy way out. All of the individual images are from before. The figures are pulled together from those earlier efforts. The combined image is still a bit of work to arrange, but took far less time than some other illustrations.

Awake Again

Passing in the Night

Awake, breathe deeply, rise.
Each day’s start is a fresh surprise.
Another day for us to live
Is way better than the alternative.

——–

The problem with sharing things which are “tongue-in-cheek” is that people don’t mind if it is my tongue poked in my own cheek, but I’ve found they are a little reluctant to have my tongue in their cheek.

saleratus

Word of the Day

saleratus

Pronunciation /ˌsaləˈreɪtəs/
noun
mass noun dated US
Sodium bicarbonate

Origin
Mid 19th century from modern Latin sal aeratus ‘aerated salt’.

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Ben put his box of saleratus in the refrigerator because his mother had done so. He really didn’t ask why.

ambrosia

Word of the Day

ambrosia

Pronunciation /amˈbrəʊzɪə/
noun
mass noun
1 Greek Mythology Roman Mythology
The food of the gods.
1.1 Something very pleasing to taste or smell.
2 A fungal product used as food by ambrosia beetles.
3 Another term for bee bread

Origin
Mid 16th century via Latin from Greek, ‘elixir of life’, from ambrotos ‘immortal’.

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If humans are made in the image of our deities, then, judging from the preferences of school-age children, at least, ambrosia, food of the gods, must be pizza.

In my old age, I’ve moved on to a tasty ice cream sundae.