false-flag

false-flag

/fɒls/ /flaɡ/
noun
1 A flag flown to disguise the true identity or affiliation of a ship.
2 usually as modifier A political or military act orchestrated in such a way that it appears to have been carried out by a party that is not in fact responsible.

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Bob fooled absolutely nobody when he threw a false-flag into the illustration of vexillology which was the word offered by the dictionary today.

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[Some will say I have cheated by using a two-word term, but I felt cheated by the dictionary algorithm offering vexillology again. I’d already done the flag illustration before checking the archives. Bah! I wasn’t about to start all over. In my defense, the dictionary offers the definition. Look it up yourself. Grump. Grouse. Grumble. Phooey!]

No prize

How many, I wonder
Will seek out the blunder?
Which are not flags,
Just nice bright rags?

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claustral

claustral

/ˈklɔːstr(ə)l/
adjective
1 Relating to a cloister or religious house.
2 literary Enveloping; confining.

Origin
Late Middle English from late Latin claustralis, from Latin claustrum ‘lock, enclosed place’ (see cloister).

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After being in a very religious school, Marie developed a claustral phobia and became a free spirit as an adult.

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Cautionary Tale

There are lots of cautionary tales out in Techland. This is one.

I worked for over an hour on a clipart to make a road roller to add to the roadwork images I had available for illustrations…

…and just before I saved the nearly finished job, the program froze. The rest of the computer seemed fine, but I COULD NOT SAVE!

I did a screen capture to give me guidance for the inevitable remake.

unsaved-roller

Moral: Do the wise thing. Save frequently as you do your work.

roller

Funny how the color changed between one version and the next.

abrogate

abrogate

/ˈabrəɡeɪt/
verb
[with object]
formal
1 Repeal or do away with (a law, right, or formal agreement)
2 Evade (a responsibility or duty)

Origin
Early 16th century from Latin abrogat- ‘repealed’, from the verb abrogare, from ab- ‘away, from’ + rogare ‘propose a law’.

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It is far too late
A slur, to abrogate,
The moment it is said.

Take care to edit thought
Before you speak aught.
Avoid “cutting him dead”.

Withhold harsh words,
Even you nerds.
Or friendship will have fled.

The chance to love
Close like a glove,
Will certainly be dead.

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Summer Solstice

Summer Solstice

Looong day.
Short night.
Cuddle close.
Don’t fight.

(for those interested…)

Winter Solstice

Short day,
Looong night.
Cuddle close.
Don’t fight.

(six month version control, for those who code.)

terrine

terrine

/təˈriːn/
noun
1 A meat, fish, or vegetable mixture that has been cooked or otherwise prepared in advance and allowed to cool or set in its container, typically served in slices.
mass noun ‘wedges of terrine’
1.1 A container used for a terrine, typically of an oblong shape and made of earthenware.

Origin
Early 18th century (denoting a tureen): from French, literally ‘large earthenware pot’, from terrin ‘earthen’. Compare with tureen.

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I suppose peach cobbler, served cold does not qualify as a terrine. Still, I’ve never developed a taste for pork pie.

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scooch

scooch
(also scootch)

/skuːtʃ/
verb
[with object]
1 North American informal – Crouch or squat.
2 North American informal – Move in or pass through a tight or narrow space.
2.1 Move a short distance, especially while seated.

Origin
Mid 19th century origin unknown.

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Jenny and Sue scooched over to make room for Sally on the couch. They planned to gossip all night while the boys hovered around them.

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tarmac

tarmac

/ˈtɑːmak/
noun
mass noun
1 trademark in UK Material used for surfacing roads or other outdoor areas, consisting of broken stone mixed with tar.
1.1 the tarmac – A runway or other area surfaced with tarmac or a similar material.
verb
tarmacs, tarmacking, tarmacked
[with object]
Surface (a road or other outdoor area) with tarmac or a similar material.

Origin
Early 20th century abbreviation of tarmacadam.

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The systems for using macadam to surface major roads in the US have progressed to the point that a fleet of equipment can strip a worn surface and replace it in a continuous, fluid operation, disrupting traffic for as little as a day or two.

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barranca

barranca

/bəˈraŋkə/
(also barranco)
noun
barrancas, barrancos
US
A narrow, winding river gorge.

Origin
Late 17th century from Spanish.

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Bob built a bridge over the barranca to avoid driving an extra ten miles to reach his ranch.

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