inroad

inroad

/ˈɪnrəʊd/
noun
1 usually make inroads in/into/on – An instance of something being encroached on or reduced by something else.
2 A hostile attack; a raid.

Origin
Mid 16th century (in inroad (sense 2 of the noun)): from in+ road (from an early use in the sense ‘riding’).

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The duke and his trusted henchmen crossed into the neighboring region on the day after their lord died, planning to “offer condolences and support” to the ten-year-old successor. In fact the duke planned a regency through which he might make inroads and assume control of the land.

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tactile

tactile

/ˈtaktʌɪl/ [tack-tile]
adjective
1 Of or connected with the sense of touch.
1.1 Perceptible by touch or apparently so; tangible.
1.2 Designed to be perceived by touch.
1.3 (of a person) given to touching other people, especially as an unselfconscious expression of sympathy or affection.

Origin
Early 17th century (in the sense ‘perceptible by touch, tangible’): from Latin tactilis, from tangere ‘to touch’.

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Tacky tactile trickiness
Trying to avoid the stickiness
Of the creaky old parole,
“something about a ten foot pole.”

(Of course, now I have failed to avoid it!)

morph

morph

/mɔːf/ [morf]
verb
1 Change smoothly from one image to another by small gradual steps using computer animation techniques.
with object – ‘the characters can be morphed on screen’
1.1 Undergo or cause to undergo a gradual process of transformation.
no object – ‘the cute moppet has morphed into the moody moll of the indie world’
noun
1 An image that has been morphed.
1.1 An instance of morphing an image.

Origin
1990s element from metamorphosis.

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GIF animations are accomplished using a sequence of separate images which morph to appear like a movie.

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tweed

tweed

/twiːd/
noun
mass noun
1 A rough-surfaced woollen cloth, typically of mixed flecked colours, originally produced in Scotland.
as modifier ‘a tweed sports jacket’
1.1 tweeds – Clothes made of tweed.

Origin
Mid 19th century originally a misreading of tweel, Scots form of twill, influenced by association with the River Tweed.

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Todd wore his tweed
While he planted the seed
Because he agreed
It was chilly, indeed.

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Shared Space

Shared Space

To put stuff in its place,
With brain and heart enlace
Correct position we may chase.
No matter the direction that we face.

A rhyme might be inverse.
Perhaps not in reverse?
We oftentimes rehearse
What finishes as verse.

The song is surely there.
Heart-and-brain aware.
Brain-and-heart? don’t care!
Just so long as we can share.

interminable

interminable

/ɪnˈtəːmɪnəb(ə)l/ [interm-in-able
adjective
Endless or apparently endless (often used hyperbolically)

Origin
Late Middle English from Old French, or from late Latin interminabilis, from in- ‘not’ + terminare (see terminate).

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We are currently enduring what seems to be interminable, deep cold weather, and it is only mid November.

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myology

myology

/mʌɪˈɒlədʒi/ [my-olo-gee]
noun
mass noun

The study of the structure, arrangement, and action of muscles.

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Cal sat silently contemplating Sally’s leg muscles as she went through her daily workout. He explained his stare as part of his myology studies.

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hemisphere

hemisphere

/ˈhɛmɪsfɪə/ [heh-mee-sveer]
noun
1 A half of a sphere.
1.1 A half of the earth, usually as divided into northern and southern halves by the equator, or into western and eastern halves by an imaginary line passing through the poles.
1.2 A half of the celestial sphere.
1.3 Each of the two parts of the cerebrum (left and right) in the brain of a vertebrate.

Origin
Late Middle English (in the sense ‘half the celestial sphere, the sky’): from Old French emisphere, via Latin from Greek hēmisphairion, from hēmi- ‘half’ + sphaira ‘sphere’.

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We must skitter across half the globe to explore the southern hemisphere.
(Well, actually we probably didn’t actually start at the north pole.)

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nonsense

nonsense

/ˈnɒns(ə)ns/ [non-sense]
noun
mass noun
1 Spoken or written words that have no meaning or make no sense.
1.1 as exclamation Used to show strong disagreement.
1.2 as modifier – Denoting verse or other writing intended to be amusing by virtue of its absurd or whimsical language.
2 Foolish or unacceptable behaviour.
2.1 count noun – Something ridiculously impractical or ill-advised.

Today, with little intelligence,
We seek some overdue recompense.
And try to finally recognize.
The vast importance of “nonsense”.

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sheaf

sheaf

/ʃiːf/ [sheef]
noun sheaves
1 A bundle of grain stalks laid lengthways and tied together after reaping.
1.1 A bundle of objects of one kind, especially papers.

Origin
Old English scēaf, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch schoof ‘sheaf’ and German Schaub ‘wisp of straw’, also to the verb shove.

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The chief thief grabbed the sheaf.
He wrapped it all in a banana leaf.
When he found that it wasn’t bearer bonds,
He knew he’d get nothing but grief.

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