phubbing

Word of the Day

phubbing

Pronunciation /ˈfʌbɪŋ/
noun
mass noun informal
The practice of ignoring one’s companion or companions in order to pay attention to one’s phone or other mobile device.

Origin
2012 blend of phone and snubbing (from snub); coined by an Australian advertising agency as part of a marketing campaign with the Macquarie Dictionary.

==========

Steve is often a schlub but so is Sue. They are always phubbing each other.

thrawn

Word of the Day

thrawn

Pronunciation /θrɔːn/
adjective
Scottish
1 Twisted; crooked.
2 Perverse; ill-tempered.

Origin
Late Middle English Scots form of thrown (see throw), in the obsolete sense ‘twisted, wrung’.

==========

Shelly and Sean stubbornly stuck with their teen-years dance craze ‘the twist’. Their grandchildren thought they were cranky and thrawn.

uncanny

Word of the Day

uncanny

Pronunciation /ʌnˈkani/
adjective uncannier, uncanniest
Strange or mysterious, especially in an unsettling way.

Origin
Late 16th century (originally Scots in the sense ‘relating to the occult, malicious’): from un-‘not’ + canny.

==========

It is uncanny how difficult it can be to deal with a day off from work. Sometimes you just feel boxed in.

solution

Word of the Day

solution

Pronunciation /səˈluːʃ(ə)n/
noun
1 A means of solving a problem or dealing with a difficult situation.
1.1 The correct answer to a puzzle.
1.2 solutions Products or services designed to meet a particular need.
2 A liquid mixture in which the minor component (the solute) is uniformly distributed within the major component (the solvent)
2.1 mass noun The process or state of being dissolved in a solvent.
3 archaic mass noun The action of separating or breaking down; dissolution.

Origin
Late Middle English from Old French, from Latin solutio(n-), from solvere ‘loosen’ (see solve).

==========

The solution to Bob’s problem did not involve dissolving anything in a solvent.

Furnace

Word of the Day

Pronunciation /ˈfəːnɪs/
noun
1 An enclosed structure in which material can be heated to very high temperatures, e.g. for smelting metals.
1.1 North American An appliance fired by gas or oil in which air or water is heated to be circulated throughout a building in a heating system.
1.2 Used to describe a very hot place.

Origin
Middle English from Old French fornais(e), from Latin fornax, fornac-, from fornus ‘oven’.

==========

The furnace is running.
The oil jet is gunning.
Because outside it’s cold.
Seven degrees Fahrenheit, I’m told.

It’s no time for screens
Storm windows, it means.
And they’re barely working
Under a blanket I’m lurking.

Startup

The new design
Came from the team.
My day’s been fine
So my eyes gleam.

But things may not be
As they now seem.
Perhaps this day’s
Been just a dream.

Tomorrow as sleep recedes
You might hear a scream.
Then we’ll assess our needs
For another wild, new scheme.

frippet

Word of the Day

frippet

Pronunciation /ˈfrɪpɪt/
noun
informal, dated British
A frivolous or showy young woman.

Origin
Early 20th century of unknown origin.

==========

Being out of date himself, Bob frivolously found frippets fascinating.

Fun in the sun
Wait,
We’re jumping the gun
Winter
Has more time to run.

banal

Word of the Day

banal

Pronunciation /bəˈnɑːl/ /bəˈnal/
adjective
So lacking in originality as to be obvious and boring.

Origin
Mid 18th century (originally relating to feudal service in the sense ‘compulsory’, hence ‘common to all’): from French, from ban ‘a proclamation or call to arms’; ultimately of Germanic origin and related to ban.

==========

I guess today’s word is just too banal to get very motivated about it.