crystal

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Word of the Day
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crystal

Pronunciation /ˈkrɪst(ə)l/
noun
A piece of a homogeneous solid substance having a natural geometrically regular form with symmetrically arranged plane faces.

Origin
Late Old English (denoting ice or a mineral resembling it), from Old French cristal, from Latin crystallum, from Greek krustallos ‘ice, crystal’. The chemistry sense dates from the early 17th century.

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Bob has spent two days attempting to design a typeface he is calling “Twisty Crystal”.

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spree

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Word of the Day
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spree

Pronunciation /spriː/
noun
1 A spell or sustained period of unrestrained activity of a particular kind.
1.1 dated – A spell of unrestrained drinking.
verb sprees, spreeing, spreed
[no object] dated
Take part in a spree.

Origin
Late 18th century of unknown origin.

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A spending spree is not for me.
I do not have sufficient money.
I try really hard to put off what I crave,
And as a result, I am able to save.

vindictive

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Word of the Day
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vindictive

Pronunciation /vɪnˈdɪktɪv/
adjective
Having or showing a strong or unreasoning desire for revenge.

Origin
Early 17th century from Latin vindicta ‘vengeance’ + -ive.

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In some sense, it is predictive
That I find the rules of man restrictive.
Blocking some from hope like a big sieve
Which leaves me feeling really vindictive.

whatsit

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Word of the Day
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whatsit

Pronunciation /ˈwɒtsɪt/
noun
informal
A thing whose name one cannot recall, does not know, or does not wish to specify.

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Oh nuts! Come on! Hand me the whatsit. I already have the thingamabob ready to go.

oops

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Word of the Day
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oops

Pronunciation /uːps/ /ʊps/
exclamation
informal
Used to show recognition of a mistake or minor accident, often as part of an apology.

Origin
Natural exclamation: first recorded in English in the 1930s.

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One word, in the middle of an operation, you do not want to hear a surgeon say, “Oops!”

Nuts and Bolts

Every week Lyn Thorne Alder posts a writing prompt challenge called “Thimbleful Thursday” at her blog of the same name. This week the idiom for the prompt is “Nuts and Bolts” with a 400 word goal. What follows is my attempt.

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Lane was tired at the end of the work day, nothing unusual about that, but he was also a little hungry, so before crossing the park to his apartment, Lane bought a small bag of peanuts. A little protein wouldn’t spoil dinner. Jeanne would be waiting. She taught school only a block west from their apartment so she was easily home before he arrived, usually before six. The winter walk diagonally across the park was sometimes difficult, but otherwise like this spring, it was a very relaxing trip. He was on the clock from nine to five, typical of a city job. Not exciting, but not difficult, either.

There were still some nannies and their young charges at the playground. At least Lane thought they were nannies. He didn’t know any of them. There was no time to stop and he had no interest in fooling around on Jeanne. They didn’t have kids of their own…yet. Maybe in a couple of years. They were both still young, late twenties, still eager to make the most of Jeanne’s vacations with which Lane was able to make his match, well except her long summer break.

Youth soccer players filled the four fields in the center of the park, two on each side of his hypotenuse trip which split the park’s large rectangle. The crossing of other similarly angled path was just ahead. It wasn’t a simple crossing, though. There was a circle like an automotive roundabout. In its center the statue of Theodore Roosevelt stood silent and proud, ignoring the typical visits of the local pigeons. The ring of benches around the statue’s grassy lawn were full, many of the parents of the soccer players watched, hoping to see a goal by their children or a save by their children. More parents were seated on the benches and lawn beside the fields too.

Skirting the statue, the parents, their dogs (always interested in those who passed by) and a wild-kicked ball from the field before him on the right, Lane hurried his steps and was about to toss the few remaining peanuts in the bag into the basket at the opposite end from where he started.

Just as he reached his hand out, the bag was knocked loose by yet another soccer ball.

A blur of gray flashes across the lawn and snags the nuts, and bolts across to the nearest tree.

straggler

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Word of the Day
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straggler

Pronunciation /ˈstraɡlə/
noun
1 A person in a group who becomes separated from the others, typically because of moving more slowly.
1.1 Something that grows or spreads irregularly or apart from others of its kind.

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It was a chore, to nag at her
For too often being a straggler.
She simply waved her rag of fur
And replied, “I will not haggle, sir!”

[My silly rhymes probably perplex people while perpetually pleasing me.]