eschatological

eschatological

/ˌɛskətəˈlɒdʒɪk(ə)l//ɛskatəˈlɒdʒɪk(ə)l/
adjective
Theology
Relating to death, judgement, and the final destiny of the soul and of humankind.

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Will the 2100s be the eschatological century?
Do prophesies say we are overdue?
Is it going to rain today?
Tough questions, all hard to answer.

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gobar

gobar

/ˈɡɒbə/
noun
mass noun
Indian
Cattle dung.

Origin
Hindi.

A gobar fire has the whiff of affiliation with a dumpster fire, if you ask me.
Then again you didn’t. I’m a bit of a goober, though, more familiar with the term “cow pie”.

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Another person commented through the Fediverse https://photog.social/@itdm5j21/101607610478788287 that their local vernacular is “country pancake”.

pavid

pavid

/ˈpavɪd/
adjective
literary
Fearful, timid.

Origin
Mid 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Blount (1618–1679), antiquary and lexicographer. From classical Latin pavidus frightened, fearful from pavēre to be frightened + -idus.

David was said to be timid.
It often made his wife livid.
He didn’t stand up to a bully
With ham fists and beard wooly.
No sports in his regular schedule
Just stamps lined up with a red rule.
About philately he was avid.
For all the rest, only pavid.

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timocracy

timocracy

/tɪˈmɒkrəsi/
noun
Philosophy
1 A form of government in which possession of property is required in order to hold office.
2 A form of government in which rulers are motivated by ambition or love of honor.

Origin
Late 15th century: from Old French timocracie, via medieval Latin from Greek timokratia, from timē ‘honour, worth’ + -kratia ‘power’. timocracy (sense 1) reflects Aristotle’s usage, timocracy (sense 2) Plato’s.

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Whether or not your local government is a timocracy, the chances of a homeless person being elected mayor are probably slim.

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potiche

potiche

/pəˈtiːʃ//pɒˈtiːʃ/
noun
A large porcelain vase, typically rounded in shape with bulging shoulders and a wide mouth, and frequently having a lid, originally produced in China during the Ming dynasty.

Origin
Early 19th century; earliest use found in The Times. Apparently from French potiche from pot + -iche, probably a variant of -isse from classical Latin -itia.

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Though it wasn’t Chinese, just a local knock off, the potiche made a perfect place for John to keep his stash of pot (now legal in his state).

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Boots

Morning errands were done in sneakers
It’s way too cold to entertain streakers.
Working now, I see the sun is gone,
Hidden above the clouds since dawn.

Beside me my boots are waiting.
They’ve gotten warm beside the grating.
Later today, they’ll be on my feet
As I go outside, the snow to greet.

This year, there’s been little snow
For me to joyfully shovel or blow.
But by later today the white stuff will show.
Then boots will go on, and outside I’ll go.

Holocene

Holocene

/ˈhɒləsiːn/
adjective
Geology
1 Relating to or denoting the present epoch, which is the second epoch in the Quaternary period and followed the Pleistocene.
Also called “Recent”
1.1 as noun – the Holocene The Holocene epoch or the system of deposits laid down during this time.
The Holocene epoch has lasted from about 10,000 years ago to the present day. It covers the period since the ice retreated after the last glaciation and it is sometimes regarded as just another interglacial period

Origin
Late 19th century: coined in French from holo- ‘whole’ + Greek kainos ‘new’.

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The most recent one percent of the Holocene epoch is being harshly marked by the species Homo sapiens

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ternary

ternary

/ˈtəːnəri/
adjective
1 Composed of three parts.
1.1 Mathematics Using three as a base.

Origin
Late Middle English: from Latin ternarius, from terni ‘three at once’.

Though terns do not gather in large groups it would not be odd to see a ternary collection. [Unabashed Pun]

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Rhyming/Poetry

When it is quality you seek,
Avoid asking me to speak.
While I give my rhymes a tweak
Their insight is typically weak.

The actual fact, you see
Is that I write, not read, with glee.
It’s the failing of my art, while free
The focus, mainly out, not in to me.

I hope that I will appreciate poetry which I get the chance to see. I enjoy what I do encounter, but I admit, I do not subscribe to any poetry publications, nor do I visit book stores to buy or sit for readings… A failing.

For me, poetry is more a case of word sound, usually as rhyme. I don’t seek out poetry to read. Others have a much better grasp of the metaphor structure which fills what I see as the best sort of poetry to. I think of my work as ditties, at best.

carlin

carlin
(also carling)

/ˈkɑːlɪn/
noun
Scottish
1 A witch.
1.1 An unpleasant or disliked old woman.

Origin
Middle English: from Old Norse kerling ‘old woman, woman’.

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Grace belied her name, consistently being a grumpy carlin. The big mole on her nose didn’t help attract others, of course.

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