spandrel

noun
1 Architecture
The almost triangular space between one side of the outer curve of an arch, a wall, and the ceiling or framework.
1.1 The space between the shoulders of adjoining arches and the ceiling or moulding above.

Origin
Late Middle English perhaps from Anglo-Norman French spaund(e)re, or from espaundre ‘expand’.

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The otherwise undecorated spandrels above the arched doors were clearly labeled.

Though upon it I don’t dwell,
No doubt, I like a spandrel
It’s no secret, so I’ll tell;
I really think they’re swell.

https://i0.wp.com/runeman.org/clipart/2020/cabinet-spandrel.png

Barmecide

(also Barmecidal)
Pronunciation /ˈbɑːmɪsʌɪd/
adjective
rare
Illusory or imaginary and therefore disappointing.
noun
rare
A person who offers benefits that are illusory or disappointing.

Origin
Early 18th century (as a noun): from Arabic Barmakī, the name of a prince in the Arabian Nights’ Entertainments, who gave a beggar a feast consisting of ornate but empty dishes.

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Political promises are basically Barmecide.

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groupie

Pronunciation /ˈɡruːpi/
noun
1 informal A young woman who regularly follows a pop group or other celebrity, especially in the hope of having a sexual relationship with them.
1.1 derogatory with modifier An enthusiastic or uncritical follower.

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Though less common, groupies are sometimes fans of violinists, not just lead guitar players.

https://i0.wp.com/runeman.org/clipart/2020/violinist-groupies.png

schnitzel

Pronunciation /ˈʃnɪtz(ə)l/
noun
A thin slice of veal or other light meat, coated in breadcrumbs and fried.

Origin
From German Schnitzel, literally ‘slice’.

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Waal, shucks, I don’t want no schnitzel. Just fry me up a breaded veal cutlet.

https://i2.wp.com/runeman.org/clipart/2020/schnitzel.png

Oh, and, by the way, Wiener Schnitzel has nothing to do with hot dogs. It is schnitzel in the style of chefs from Vienna (Wien, Austria).

outbreak

Pronunciation /ˈaʊtbreɪk/
noun
A sudden occurrence of something unwelcome, such as war or disease.

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Since the outbreak of the pandemic, all we want to do is break out of our restrictions.

https://i1.wp.com/runeman.org/clipart/2020/jailed.png

calumny

Pronunciation /ˈkaləmni/
noun calumnies
mass noun
1 The making of false and defamatory statements about someone in order to damage their reputation; slander.
1.1 count noun A false and slanderous statement.
verb calumnies, calumnying, calumnied
[with object]formal
Slander (someone).

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin calumnia.

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His day-to-day utterances were full of calumny. None other could be a fine as he, himself.

https://i2.wp.com/runeman.org/clipart/2020/silhouette-male-armscrossed.png

paludal

Pronunciation /pəˈl(j)uːd(ə)l/ /ˈpal(j)ʊd(ə)l/
adjective
Ecology
(of a plant, animal, or soil) living or occurring in a marshy habitat.

Origin
Early 19th century from Latin palus, palud- ‘marsh’ + -al.

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Cattails were, in my youth, a good indicator of a paludal area. Common Reed (genus Phragmites), a very invasive plant, has overtaken such spaces.

https://i1.wp.com/runeman.org/clipart/2020/phragmites.png

subservient

Pronunciation /səbˈsəːvɪənt/
adjective
1 Prepared to obey others unquestioningly.
1.1 Less important; subordinate.
1.2 Serving as a means to an end.

Origin
Mid 17th century from Latin subservient- ‘subjecting to, complying with’, from the verb subservire (see subserve).

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Luke was amenable, some would say subservient. He willingly enabled his wife’s every whim.

https://i0.wp.com/runeman.org/clipart/2020/whim-subservient.png