acroamatic

acroamatic

/ˌakrəʊəˈmatɪk/
adjective
1 rare Of or relating to hearing.
2 Privately communicated by oral teaching to chosen disciples only; esoteric, secret.

Origin
Mid 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Randolph (d. 1635), poet and playwright. From post-classical Latin acroamaticus privately communicated by oral teaching to chosen disciples only, esoteric, secret, disposed to listen and its etymon Hellenistic Greek ἀκροαματικός designed for hearing only, delivered orally, esoteric, capable of listening from ancient Greek ἀκροαματ-, ἀκρόαμα + -ικός.

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The secrets of alchemy were shared, but only in a limited, often acroamatic way. Science, by contrast was designed with publishing in mind.

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sufficient

sufficient

/səˈfɪʃ(ə)nt/
adjective & determiner
Enough; adequate.
as adjective ‘he had a small private income which was sufficient for her needs’
as determiner ‘they had sufficient resources to survive’

Origin
Middle English (in the sense ‘legally satisfactory’): from Old French, or from Latin sufficient- ‘meeting the need of’ (see suffice).

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There is always sufficient reason to seek out words which strengthen one’s writing.

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wayfarer

wayfarer

/ˈweɪfɛːrə/
noun
literary

A person who travels on foot.

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Josh was a wayfarer and wanderer. When in the woods, people often called him a hiker. In town, he was something more pedestrian.

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Illustrating an Idea

I grab ideas wherever I can. Today, I was inspired to try to make a flame by seeing a toot on the federated social media using Mastodon’s web interface. I do most of my random short posts there. It is a more friendly environment than the ones at Facebook or even Twitter, and it has the extra benefit (from my perspective) that it is not run by a corporation whose purpose is to track my online activities in order to make money from analysis of my behavior.

I’m signed up as @algot@mastodon.art and I share my creations there as I also do here. There are servers set up all over the place and are run and paid for by the participants, not a controlling company. People on an “instance” agree to a code of conduct and that leads to supportive, civil, engaging conversation instead of rude, harsh attacks. People get banned for bad behavior. Moderators of mastodon.art have done a great job, in my opinion.

I don’t know which “platform” gets more views. I’m not sure if I really care. After all, doing the work comes first. Sharing comes second. Getting seen is mostly out of my hands. I do hope that others sometimes enjoy what they see.

Today, I saw a post which included a very effective flame image.

crime

I felt the immediate urge to make my own version of the flame so that I could use it in my own illustrations. I launched Inkscape and set to work. I think I’m happy enough with my version to move ahead to create a useful illustration incorporating the clipart. I’m happy.

flame  question-burning

So, in addition, I will ask the burning question, “How is Saturday going for you?”

 

 

makeshift

makeshift

/ˈmeɪkʃɪft/
adjective
Acting as an interim and temporary measure.
noun
A temporary substitute or device.

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Bob didn’t have time to enough time to polish his image for today. He made do with something makeshift.

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splendiferous

splendiferous

/splɛnˈdɪf(ə)rəs/
adjective
informal, humorous
Splendid.

Origin
Mid 19th century formed irregularly from splendour.

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Melanie’s hat was splendiferous, but also quite heavy, since the fruit perched atop it was all real.

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ingenuity

ingenuity

/ˌɪndʒɪˈnjuːɪti/
noun
mass noun
The quality of being clever, original, and inventive.

Origin
Late 16th century (also in the senses ‘nobility’ and ‘ingenuousness’): from Latin ingenuitas ‘ingenuousness’, from ingenuus ‘inborn’. The current meaning arose by confusion of ingenuous with ingenious.

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It does not take ingenuity to find a new word every day, just a big enough dictionary.
(A clever cleaver might help, of coure.)

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fortuitous

fortuitous

/fɔːˈtjuːɪtəs/
adjective
1 Happening by chance rather than intention.
1.1 Happening by a lucky chance; fortunate.

Usage
The traditional, etymological meaning of fortuitous is ‘happening by chance’: a fortuitous meeting is a chance meeting, which might turn out to be either a good thing or a bad thing. Today, however, fortuitous tends to be often used to refer only to fortunate outcomes and the word has become more or less a synonym for ‘lucky’ or ‘fortunate’ (the ball went into the goal by a fortuitous ricochet). Although this usage is now widespread, it is still regarded by some people as incorrect

Origin
Mid 17th century from Latin fortuitus, from forte ‘by chance’, from fors ‘chance, luck’.

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Tentatively, without a plan, Stan proceeded across the open meadow. Fortuitous results occurred. Whether for good or ill, he’ll know in a moment.

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chicanery

chicanery

/ʃɪˈkeɪnəri/
noun
mass noun
The use of deception or subterfuge to achieve one’s purpose.

Origin
Late 16th century from French chicanerie, from chicaner ‘to quibble’ (see chicane).

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A Ponzi scheme, classic chicanery, offers investors returns too good to be true.

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