paternal

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Word of the Day
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paternal

Pronunciation /pəˈtəːn(ə)l/
adjective
1 Of or appropriate to a father.
1.1 Showing a kindness and care associated with a father; fatherly.
2 attributive Related through the father.

Origin
Late Middle English from late Latin paternalis, from Latin paternus ‘fatherly, belonging to a father’, from pater ‘father’.

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Just what makes Sunday June 20, 2021 a festive, paternal day is lost to the mists of time (or at least the ones of Spokane, Washington), but perhaps you can enjoy it anyway.

scamper

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Word of the Day
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scamper

Pronunciation /ˈskampə/
verb
no object, with adverbial of direction
(especially of a small animal or child) run with quick light steps, especially through fear or excitement.
noun
in singular
An act of scampering.

Origin
Late 17th century (in the sense ‘run away’): probably from scamp.

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It is little stretch to see that, for the purposes of evasion, a stride might not succeed so well as a scamper. Success is, however, in the actual escape.

bargainous

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Word of the Day
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bargainous

Pronunciation /ˈbɑːɡɪnəs/
adjective
informal British
Costing less than is usual or than might be expected; cheap or relatively cheap.

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Bill bought a bountiful, bargainous bundle of beautiful blue balloons.

invincible

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Word of the Day
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invincible

Pronunciation /ɪnˈvɪnsɪb(ə)l/
adjective
Too powerful to be defeated or overcome.

Origin
Late Middle English (earlier than vincible): via Old French from Latin invincibilis, from in- ‘not’ + vincibilis (see vincible).

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The Atlantic hurricane season is full of invincible storms. It is upon us once again. “Bill” has been named…an anticipation of the season’s cost?

paddock bomb

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Word of the Day
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paddock bomb

noun
informal Australian
An old car, often unregistered, used solely for driving round farmland or wild countryside.

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Paul pursued the stray cattle across the station in his pristine paddock bomb. The stock didn’t react too well.

Landscaper’s Lament

Tuesday drips some brighter
After a rainy overnighter
Expect more showers this morning
And for afternoon lightning, there is a warning.

Wednesday’s prediction is “Sunny”,
And I guess there is some hope.
So through today we’ll grope,
And use tomorrow to make our money.

upholstery

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Word of the Day
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upholstery

Pronunciation /ʌpˈhəʊlst(ə)ri/ /ʌpˈhɒlst(ə)ri/
noun
mass noun
1 Soft, padded textile covering that is fixed to furniture such as armchairs and sofas.
1.1 The art or practice of upholstering furniture.

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Sam sank slowly into the upholstery of his easy chair. It always absorbs his fatigue, relaxing his day-drained muscles and releasing the tension in his joints. Very soon he naps, waking for supper, followed by a couple of hours watching baseball on TV with Edith before heading off to bed.

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[Lexico didn’t offer an origin this time, so I consulted with Etymonline.com, checking ‘upholsterer’ and its recommended ‘uphold’.]

upholsterer (n.)

“tradesman who finishes or repairs articles of furniture” (1610s), from upholdester (early 15c.; early 14c. as a surname), formed with diminutive (originally fem.) suffix -ster + obsolete Middle English noun upholder “dealer in small goods” (c. 1300), from upholden “to repair, uphold, keep from falling or sinking” (in this case, by stuffing); see uphold (v.).

uphold (v.)

c. 1200, “support, sustain,” from up (adv.) + hold (v.). Similar formation in Old Frisian upholda, Middle Dutch ophouden, German aufhalten. Meaning “maintain in good condition or repair” is from 1570s. Related: Upheld; upholding.

In software circles, the people who keep (especially FOSS) programs up-to-date are called ‘maintainers’. Sometimes, the ones who work on the very core elements of operating systems and infrastructure are called ‘plumbers’. Nonetheless, I do not think ‘upholsterer’ will catch on for a maintainer of GUI software which allows us to use easy, comfortable clicks and gestures and to avoid the command line interface.

sanitary

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Word of the Day
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sanitary

Pronunciation /ˈsanɪt(ə)ri/
adjective
1 Relating to the conditions that affect hygiene and health, especially the supply of sewage facilities and clean drinking water.
1.1 Hygienic and clean.

Origin
Mid 19th century from French sanitaire, from Latin sanitas ‘health’, from sanus ‘healthy’.

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Sadly, keeping a place clean does not always mean the same as keeping it sanitary. Sterile goes even beyond that.

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