monitum

/ˈmɒnɪtəm//ˈmɒnɪtʊm/
noun
A document giving warning of something, or giving a warning to someone; (Roman Catholic Church) a warning sent to a particular person or about a particular issue by the Holy Office.

Origin
Early 18th century; earliest use found in John Flamsteed (1646–1719), astronomer. From post-classical Latin monitum, specifically use of singular form corresponding to classical Latin monita warnings, precepts, use as noun of neuter plural of monitus, past participle of monēre to advise, warn.

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“The sky is falling!” was the monitum of Chicken Little, though that classic children’s story probably wasn’t taken from classical Latin.

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