polyloquent

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Word of the Day
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polyloquent

Pronunciation /pəˈlɪləkw(ə)nt/ /pɒˈlɪləkw(ə)nt/
adjective
That talks or writes a great deal, loquacious; verbose.

Origin
Mid 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Blount (1618–1679), antiquary and lexicographer. From poly- + -loquent.

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“Um…” said Ted. [He smiled, bowed, waved and walked off stage to thunderous applause. His talk ended with that, as soon as it started. He was definitely not polyloquent.]

Food

I am no gourmand,
But still I am fond
Of fish from a pond
From here or beyond.

When stopping for lunch
I enjoy what I munch.
And you should have a hunch
I approve of some crunch.

I eat for the taste
And never in haste,
And consider it a waste
When something’s like paste.

Of course, then, there’s hummus
About which I won’t fuss,
A habit I’ll discuss
With crackers a plus.

abjugate

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Word of the Day
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abjugate

Pronunciation /ˈabdʒʊɡeɪt/
verb
rare
To unyoke, uncouple; to free.

Origin
Mid 18th century; earliest use found in Nathan Bailey (d. 1742), lexicographer and schoolmaster. From classical Latin abiugāt-, past participial stem of abiugāre to separate, unyoke from ab- + iugāre.

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Ben was acknowledged a dumb ox, but he was abjugated after the prosecutor confirmed his alibi was rock solid, and the police had another guy in custody whose finger prints matched the bloody set found at the scene.

domesticity

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Word of the Day
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domesticity

Pronunciation /ˌdɒmɛˈstɪsɪti/ /ˌdəʊmɛˈstɪsɪti/
noun
mass noun
Home or family life.

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We dream of happy, comfortable domesticity. Sometimes we get it.

combustion

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Word of the Day
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combustion

Pronunciation /kəmˈbʌstʃ(ə)n/
noun
mass noun
1 The process of burning something.
1.1 Chemistry Rapid chemical combination of a substance with oxygen, involving the production of heat and light.

Origin
Late Middle English from late Latin combustio(n-), from Latin comburere ‘burn up’.

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Bob’s ever-smouldering online dictionary frustration again burst into flame after reading the definition for “combustive” which merely said, “See combustion.”

Saturday

Cloud cover at dawn,
Nothing new about it.
Who needs the sun,
As for breakfast, I sit?

Coffee, yes there’s that,
Peanut butter sandwich,too.
Some grapes for morning juice.
Grown by whom, I never knew.

Read the morning news
My team won, hooray.
Then begin the fun
Which will fill my day.

barricade

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Word of the Day
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barricade

Pronunciation /ˌbarɪˈkeɪd/
noun
An improvised barrier erected across a street or other thoroughfare to prevent or delay the movement of opposing forces.
verb
[with object]
1 Block or defend with a barricade.
1.1 Shut (someone) into a place by blocking all the entrances.

Origin
Late 16th century from French, from barrique ‘cask’, from Spanish barrica; related to barrel (barrels often being used to build barricades).

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Bob’s attempt to build a barricade to block the repossession of his car was probably in vain.