promising

promising

/ˈprɒmɪsɪŋ/ [prom-iss-ing]
adjective
Showing signs of future success.

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Sid, seen as promising throughout his career, finally retired and only then achieved his long-anticipated success.

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outlook

outlook

/ˈaʊtlʊk/ [out-look]
noun
1 A person’s point of view or general attitude to life.
2 A view.
2.1 A place from which a view is possible; a vantage point.
2.2 The prospect for the future.

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Every day, yes, in every way, I look forward to the WotD! i guess you’d say I have a positive outlook.

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boost

boost

/buːst/ [boost]
verb
[with object]
1 Help or encourage (something) to increase or improve.
1.1 Amplify (an electrical signal)
2 North American Push from below.
3 North American informal Steal (something)

noun
1 A source of help or encouragement leading to increase or improvement.
1.1 An increase or improvement.
2 North American A push from below.

Origin
Early 19th century (originally US, in boost (sense 2 of the verb)): of unknown origin.

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If you need help, just ask me, I’ll do my best to give you a boost.

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whatsoever

whatsoever

/wɒtsəʊˈɛvə/ [wut-so-ever]
adverb
with negative
At all (used for emphasis)
‘I have no doubt whatsoever’

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Let’s be frank. I have no need whatsoever for the word “whatsoever”.
(If you don’t want to be Frank, you can be George or Sally.)
(And, if you are from Bahstun, it’s pronounced wut-so-evah!)

Whatever.

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shrink

shrink

/ʃrɪŋk/ [shrink]
verb – shrank, shrunk, shrunken
1 Become or make smaller in size or amount.
1.1 no object (of clothes or material) become smaller as a result of being immersed in water.
1.2 as adjective shrunken (of a person’s face or other part of the body) wrinkled or shrivelled through old age or illness.
1.3 shrink something on with object Slip a metal tyre or other fitting on to (something) while it is expanded with heat and allow it to tighten in place.
2 no object, with adverbial of direction Move back or away, especially because of fear or disgust.
2.1 shrink from – often with negative Be averse to or unwilling to do (something difficult or unappealing)
2.2 shrink into oneself – no object Become withdrawn.

noun
informal
A psychiatrist.

Origin
Old English scrincan, of Germanic origin; related to Swedish skrynka ‘to wrinkle’.

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Do not shrink your T-shirts. You will look silly. People may recommend you see a shrink when you wear them.

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recurrent

recurrent

/rɪˈkʌr(ə)nt/ [re-cur-ent]
adjective
1 Occurring often or repeatedly.
2 Anatomy – (of a nerve or blood vessel) turning back so as to reverse direction.

Origin
Late 16th century (in recurrent (sense 2)): from Latin recurrent- ‘running back’, from the verb recurrere (see recur).

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Rule: Repetition, no. Recurrence, okay. It’s an issue of focus.

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filament

filament

/ˈfɪləm(ə)nt/ [fill-uh-ment]
noun
1 A slender threadlike object or fibre, especially one found in animal or plant structures.
1.1 Botany The slender part of a stamen that supports the anther.
1.2 Astronomy A slender, elongated body of luminous gas or other material in the sun’s atmosphere, a nebula, or interstellar space.
2 A conducting wire or thread with a high melting point, forming part of an electric bulb or thermionic valve and heated or made incandescent by an electric current.

Origin
Late 16th century from French, or from modern Latin filamentum, from late Latin filare ‘to spin’, from Latin filum ‘thread’.

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Bulbs with light emitting diodes (LED) are being designed to mimic early “Edison style” incandescent filament lightbulbs.

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