toupee

==============
Word of the Day
==============

toupee

Pronunciation /ˈtuːpeɪ/
noun
A small artificial hairpiece worn to cover a bald spot.

Origin
Early 18th century (denoting a curl or lock of artificial hair): alteration of French toupet ‘hair tuft’, diminutive of Old French toup ‘tuft’, ultimately of Germanic origin and related to top.

=========

Tony was perennially challenged by the poor design of his toupees.

Fiber Arts

I cannot sew, you ought to know.
I try to knit and have a fit.
With batik, I’m up a creek.
As for crochet, there is no way.

With cross-stitch, some small success,
Though many said it was a mess.
So all my outfits will be bland
Lacking skill with crafts of hand.

It Happens

Thursday came and went.
An email wasn’t sent.
You must blame this gent.
Herein, I do repent.

I must have been distracted.
And the lapse won’t be protracted.
Don’t know how you reacted.
Your nasty words have been redacted.

dastardly

===============
Word of the Day
===============

dastardly

Pronunciation /ˈdastədli/ /ˈdɑːstədli/
adjective
dated, humorous
Wicked and cruel.

Origin
Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘dull or stupid’): from dastard in the obsolete sense ‘base coward’.

==========

The dastardly landlord gloated as he strode away, holding tight to the last of his destitute tenant’s meager pay.

journeyman

===============
Word of the Day
===============

journeyman

Pronunciation /ˈdʒəːnɪmən/
noun
journeymen
1 A worker or sports player who is reliable but not outstanding.
2 historical A trained worker who is employed by someone else.
as modifier ‘a journeyman carpenter’

Origin
Late Middle English from journey (in the obsolete sense ‘day’s work’) + man; so named because the journeyman was no longer bound by indentures but was paid by the day.

=====

As is obvious from the level of sample sentences used in many of these WotD entries, the current word wrangler is as much a word mangler, and just a journeyman lexicographer.

[Some would aver that he is a mere apprentice, or even just a tyro.]

frivolous

frivolous

Pronunciation /ˈfrɪv(ə)ləs/
adjective
1 Not having any serious purpose or value.
1.1 (of a person) carefree and superficial.

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin frivolus ‘silly, trifling’ + -ous.

==========

Do not let anyone tell you that wordplay is frivolous, and it’s a darn sight better than playing with your food!

Did anybody else notice, some word genius decided that giving -ous to the end of the word was better than the shorter/simpler Latin spelling?

movie

==============
Word of the Day
==============

movie

Pronunciation /ˈmuːvi/
noun
1 North American A cinema film.
1.1 the movies Films generally or the film industry.

==========

Movie, not “cinema”, not “motion picture”, not “film”, that’s the word I most often use.