feeble

feeble

/ˈfēbəl/ /ˈfibəl/
adjective feebler, feeblest
1 Lacking physical strength, especially as a result of age or illness.
1.1 (of a sound) faint.
1.2 Lacking strength of character.
1.3 Failing to convince or impress.

Origin
Middle English from Old French fieble, earlier fleible, from Latin flebilis ‘lamentable’, from flere ‘weep’.

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Every day, Bob makes what usually turns out to be a feeble attempt to use a “new” word in an effective sentence. The result is commonly ineffectual.

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aspersion

aspersion

/əˈspəːʃ(ə)n/
noun
usually aspersions
An attack on the reputation or integrity of someone or something.

Origin
Late Middle English (denoting the sprinkling of water, especially at baptism): from Latin aspersio(n-), from aspergere (see asperse).

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Casting aspersions is like casting bait in the sense of baiting one’s opponent.

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eupepsia

eupepsia

/juːˈpɛpsɪə/
noun
mass noun rare
Good digestion; absence of indigestion.

Origin
Early 18th century from Greek eupepsia, from eupeptos (see eupeptic).

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You got eupepsia if you got Pepsi, huh?

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feral

feral

/ˈfɛr(ə)l/ /ˈfɪərəl/
adjective
1 (especially of an animal) in a wild state, especially after escape from captivity or domestication.
1.1 Resembling or characteristic of a wild animal.
1.2 (of a young person) behaving in a wildly undisciplined and antisocial way.
noun
derogatory Australian
A person with an unconventional appearance and lifestyle, and anti-establishment views.

Origin
Early 17th century from Latin fera ‘wild animal’ (from ferus ‘wild’) + -al.

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Skippy dreamed of being his feral self.

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shackle

shackle

/ˈʃak(ə)l/
noun
1 shackles – A pair of fetters connected together by a chain, used to fasten a prisoner’s wrists or ankles together.
1.1 A situation or factor that restrains or restricts someone or something.
2 A metal link, typically U-shaped, closed by a bolt, used to secure a chain or rope to something.
2.1 A pivoted link connecting a spring in a vehicle’s suspension to the body of the vehicle.

verb
[with object]
1 Chain with shackles.
1.1 Restrain; limit.

Origin
Old English sc(e)acul ‘fetter’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch schakel ‘link, coupling’.

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Only a fool will cackle
When you put him in a shackle.
If you put a few together,
They’ll dance in any weather.

They’ll jump and prance, whee!
To you entrance, see?
To any well-sung music.
It’s a truly special trick.

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grungy

grungy

/ˈɡrənjē/ /ˈɡrəndʒi/
adjective grungier, grungiest
1 informal Grimy; dirty.
2 Relating to or denoting a form of rock music characterized by a raucous guitar sound and lazy vocal delivery.
2.1 Relating to the fashion associated with grunge rock, including loose, layered clothing and ripped jeans.

Origin
1960s perhaps suggested by grubby and dingy.

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While I have no fear of dirt,
(How much can it hurt?),
There’s no need to be grungy.
Just wipe down with a sponge, see!

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(Homage to Charles Schultz character Pig-Pen from “Peanuts”)

recuperate

recuperate

/rəˈko͞opəˌrāt/ /rəˈkupəˌreɪt/
verb
1 no object Recover from illness or exertion.
2 with object Recover or regain (something lost or taken)

Origin
Mid 16th century from Latin recuperat- ‘regained’, from the verb recuperare, from re- ‘back’ + capere ‘take’.

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In the event this word is late
It’s because I wasn’t feeling great.
I took a nap and woke up late.
I shall strive, now, to recuperate
At a really, really rapid rate.

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sigil

sigil

/ˈsɪdʒɪl/
noun
1 An inscribed or painted symbol considered to have magical power.
1.1 archaic A seal.
1.2 literary A sign or symbol.

Origin
Late Middle English from late Latin sigillum ‘sign’.

Stanley spied the sigil
While silent on his vigil.
It was, to him, no shock
To see it carved in rock.

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[You might guess from the illustration that one of my favorite actors is Sigil Shepherd.]