cenotaph

cenotaph

/ˈsɛnətɑːf/ /ˈsɛnətaf/
noun
1 A monument to someone buried elsewhere, especially one commemorating people who died in a war.
1.1 the Cenotaph – The war memorial in Whitehall, London, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and erected in 1919–20.

Origin
Early 17th century from French cénotaphe, from late Latin cenotaphium, from Greek kenos ‘empty’ + taphos ‘tomb’.

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The Washington Monument serves as a national symbol for the USA while also being a cenotaph, of sorts. President Washington’s remains are buried at Mount Vernon, Virginia.

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Us

Each of us
Offers the world
What we can.

None of us
Deserve to be hurled
Into the van.

Be one of us
With love’s flag unfurled
Follow that plan.

axiomatic

axiomatic

/ˌaksɪəˈmatɪk/
adjective
1 Self-evident or unquestionable.
1.1 Mathematics Relating to or containing axioms.

Origin
Late 18th century from Greek axiōmatikos, from axiōma ‘what is thought fitting’ (see axiom).

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It is axiomatic of some peoples thinking that they are intrinsically better than me.
Challenge axioms to understand and change the world.

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curmudgeon

curmudgeon

/kəːˈmʌdʒ(ə)n/
noun
A bad-tempered person, especially an old one.

Origin
Late 16th century of unknown origin.

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Thursday at 2:04PM, Thomas revealed his true nature, a curmudgeon. Nobody was surprised. He had never been the life of any party, much less this one, for his retirement.

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pirogue

pirogue

/pɪˈrəʊɡ/
noun
A long, narrow canoe made from a single tree trunk, especially in Central America and the Caribbean.

Origin
Early 17th century from French, probably from Carib.

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Bob got all fired up when he became involved in making a 20 foot pirogue from a storm-felled white pine. The team used axes and adzes and fire.

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