jangle

jangle

/ˈjaNGɡəl/ /ˈdʒæŋɡəl/
verb
1 Make or cause to make a ringing metallic sound, typically a discordant one.
1.1 with object (with reference to nerves) set on edge.
noun
in singular
A ringing metallic sound.

Origin
Middle English (in the sense ‘talk excessively or noisily, squabble’): from Old French jangler, of unknown origin.

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After all was said and done, Wile E. Coyote was left with only a persistent jangling in his ears as the road runner, once again, ran off.

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(Homage to Chuck Jones and Michael Maltese of “Looney Tunes” fame)

wonky

wonky

/ˈwäNGkē/ /ˈwɑŋki/
adjective wonkier, wonkiest
1 informal Crooked; off-center; askew.
1.1 (of a thing) unsteady; shaky.
1.2 Not functioning correctly; faulty.

Origin
Early 20th century fanciful formation.

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Wobbling wildly, John was in dire need of gyroscopic adjustment. Until then, he suffered being wonky.

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diligent

/ˈdɪlɪdʒ(ə)nt/
adjective
Having or showing care and conscientiousness in one’s work or duties.

Origin
Middle English via Old French from Latin diligens, diligent- ‘assiduous’, from diligere ‘love, take delight in’.

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Bob seemed to become diligent only in later life. In fact, he had always taken delight in his activities.

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theurgy

To help you grow,
Each day we’ll show
A new word to know,
Broad knowledge sew

/ˈθiːəːdʒi/
noun
mass noun
1 The operation or effect of a supernatural or divine agency in human affairs.
1.1 A system of white magic practised by the early Neoplatonists.

Origin
Mid 16th century via late Latin from Greek theourgia ‘sorcery’, from theos ‘god’ + -ergos ‘working’.

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It happens to be coincidental that theurgy is a Sunday word offering. There was no supernatural cause.

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twaddle

twaddle

/ˈtwɒd(ə)l/
noun
mass noun informal
Trivial or foolish speech or writing; nonsense.

verb
[no object]informal, archaic
Talk or write in a trivial or foolish way.

Origin
Late 18th century alteration of earlier twattle, of unknown origin.

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When I walk, I waddle
As I spout my routine twaddle.
So, here’s advice to you:
Don’t take me as your model.

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[We may be accused of publishing twaddle, but we do it with great sincerity.]

fellness

/ˈfɛlnəs/
noun
archaic, rare
With reference to a person or animal, their actions or attributes: fierceness, harshness, savagery; cruelty; malignity; an instance of this. In early use also: sternness, severity (obsolete).

Origin
Late Middle English (in an earlier sense). From fell + -ness.

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Covid exhibits fellness,
Attacking hard, out wellness.
And so we’re stuck at home
And not allowed to roam.

Corona is archaic
Mutated to a new trick.
And like the ’18 flu
Has caused a big to-do.

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[Though archaic, this word’s intent remains in the phrase “one fell swoop” when an all encompassing event happens.

feeble

feeble

/ˈfēbəl/ /ˈfibəl/
adjective feebler, feeblest
1 Lacking physical strength, especially as a result of age or illness.
1.1 (of a sound) faint.
1.2 Lacking strength of character.
1.3 Failing to convince or impress.

Origin
Middle English from Old French fieble, earlier fleible, from Latin flebilis ‘lamentable’, from flere ‘weep’.

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Every day, Bob makes what usually turns out to be a feeble attempt to use a “new” word in an effective sentence. The result is commonly ineffectual.

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aspersion

aspersion

/əˈspəːʃ(ə)n/
noun
usually aspersions
An attack on the reputation or integrity of someone or something.

Origin
Late Middle English (denoting the sprinkling of water, especially at baptism): from Latin aspersio(n-), from aspergere (see asperse).

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Casting aspersions is like casting bait in the sense of baiting one’s opponent.

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eupepsia

eupepsia

/juːˈpɛpsɪə/
noun
mass noun rare
Good digestion; absence of indigestion.

Origin
Early 18th century from Greek eupepsia, from eupeptos (see eupeptic).

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You got eupepsia if you got Pepsi, huh?

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feral

feral

/ˈfɛr(ə)l/ /ˈfɪərəl/
adjective
1 (especially of an animal) in a wild state, especially after escape from captivity or domestication.
1.1 Resembling or characteristic of a wild animal.
1.2 (of a young person) behaving in a wildly undisciplined and antisocial way.
noun
derogatory Australian
A person with an unconventional appearance and lifestyle, and anti-establishment views.

Origin
Early 17th century from Latin fera ‘wild animal’ (from ferus ‘wild’) + -al.

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Skippy dreamed of being his feral self.

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