theurgy

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/ˈθiːəːdʒi/
noun
mass noun
1 The operation or effect of a supernatural or divine agency in human affairs.
1.1 A system of white magic practised by the early Neoplatonists.

Origin
Mid 16th century via late Latin from Greek theourgia ‘sorcery’, from theos ‘god’ + -ergos ‘working’.

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It happens to be coincidental that theurgy is a Sunday word offering. There was no supernatural cause.

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twaddle

twaddle

/ˈtwɒd(ə)l/
noun
mass noun informal
Trivial or foolish speech or writing; nonsense.

verb
[no object]informal, archaic
Talk or write in a trivial or foolish way.

Origin
Late 18th century alteration of earlier twattle, of unknown origin.

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When I walk, I waddle
As I spout my routine twaddle.
So, here’s advice to you:
Don’t take me as your model.

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[We may be accused of publishing twaddle, but we do it with great sincerity.]

fellness

/ˈfɛlnəs/
noun
archaic, rare
With reference to a person or animal, their actions or attributes: fierceness, harshness, savagery; cruelty; malignity; an instance of this. In early use also: sternness, severity (obsolete).

Origin
Late Middle English (in an earlier sense). From fell + -ness.

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Covid exhibits fellness,
Attacking hard, out wellness.
And so we’re stuck at home
And not allowed to roam.

Corona is archaic
Mutated to a new trick.
And like the ’18 flu
Has caused a big to-do.

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[Though archaic, this word’s intent remains in the phrase “one fell swoop” when an all encompassing event happens.

shackle

shackle

/ˈʃak(ə)l/
noun
1 shackles – A pair of fetters connected together by a chain, used to fasten a prisoner’s wrists or ankles together.
1.1 A situation or factor that restrains or restricts someone or something.
2 A metal link, typically U-shaped, closed by a bolt, used to secure a chain or rope to something.
2.1 A pivoted link connecting a spring in a vehicle’s suspension to the body of the vehicle.

verb
[with object]
1 Chain with shackles.
1.1 Restrain; limit.

Origin
Old English sc(e)acul ‘fetter’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch schakel ‘link, coupling’.

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Only a fool will cackle
When you put him in a shackle.
If you put a few together,
They’ll dance in any weather.

They’ll jump and prance, whee!
To you entrance, see?
To any well-sung music.
It’s a truly special trick.

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grungy

grungy

/ˈɡrənjē/ /ˈɡrəndʒi/
adjective grungier, grungiest
1 informal Grimy; dirty.
2 Relating to or denoting a form of rock music characterized by a raucous guitar sound and lazy vocal delivery.
2.1 Relating to the fashion associated with grunge rock, including loose, layered clothing and ripped jeans.

Origin
1960s perhaps suggested by grubby and dingy.

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While I have no fear of dirt,
(How much can it hurt?),
There’s no need to be grungy.
Just wipe down with a sponge, see!

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(Homage to Charles Schultz character Pig-Pen from “Peanuts”)

recuperate

recuperate

/rəˈko͞opəˌrāt/ /rəˈkupəˌreɪt/
verb
1 no object Recover from illness or exertion.
2 with object Recover or regain (something lost or taken)

Origin
Mid 16th century from Latin recuperat- ‘regained’, from the verb recuperare, from re- ‘back’ + capere ‘take’.

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In the event this word is late
It’s because I wasn’t feeling great.
I took a nap and woke up late.
I shall strive, now, to recuperate
At a really, really rapid rate.

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