rhymeist

Rhymeist

So long as it is possible
I’ll write rhymes I hope are passable.
It will make some of you irascible
“Not poetry! Just lotsa bull.”

Until the very end
Some of my time I’ll spend
Bouncing words round the bend
That is sure what I intend.

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impish

impish

/ˈɪmpɪʃ/

adjective
Inclined to do slightly naughty things for fun; mischievous.

Origin
Old English impa, impe ‘young shoot, scion’, impian ‘to graft’, based on Greek emphuein ‘to implant’. In late Middle English, the noun denoted a descendant, especially of a noble family, and later a child of the devil or a person regarded as such; hence a ‘little devil’ or mischievous child (early 17th century).

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Todd was impish,
A little scamp.
He rode his skateboard
Down the busy ramp.

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slaughter

slaughter

/ˈslɔːtə/
verb
[with object]
1 Kill (animals) for food.
1.1 Kill (people or animals) in a cruel or violent way, typically in large numbers.
1.2informal Defeat (an opponent) thoroughly.
noun
mass noun
1 The killing of animals for food.
1.1 The killing of a large number of people or animals in a cruel or violent way.
1.2 informal count noun A thorough defeat.

Origin
Middle English (as a noun): from Old Norse slátr ‘butcher’s meat’; related to slay. The verb dates from the mid 16th century.

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See before you the site of significant slaughter.

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See before you a site of slaughter
Where fields were just trampled mud.
Replacing farmland whose grain grew fat.
Now the crop is just standing stones.

From this field of man made stones
There is no harvest to be had,
And fewer still to bring one home.
Bitter sadness, what we most recall.

Years of wind and rain and snow
Etch away the names of heroes
And quivering cowards alike.
They’re no more dead, one than the other.

And, as the generations pass,
Some may hold smoldering hate close,
Visiting here less to mourn
Than to stir and bank the coals of vengeance.

coffret

coffret

/ˈkɒfrɪt/
noun
A small box or container.

Origin
Late 15th century: from Old French, ‘small chest’, diminutive of coffre (see coffer).

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Martin carried the coffret
In a corner of his pocket,
Inside of which, a locket.
To his girlfriend he would offer it.

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