gunky

gunky

/ˈɡʌŋki/
adjective
informal
Unpleasantly sticky or messy.

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Avoid overdoing your minor wound treatment. In order of gunkiness, Aquaphor™ is least gunky, Petroleum jelly (Vaseline™) somewhere toward the middle and perhaps Cosmoline™ the most, and Cosmoline is NOT for skin application.

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flexure

flexure

/ˈflɛkʃə/
noun
mass noun Anatomy Geology
technical
1 The action of bending or curving, or the condition of being bent or curved.
1.1 count noun A bent or curved part.

Origin
Late 16th century: from Latin flexura, from flectere ‘to bend’.

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The mountain range displayed a strange flexure
As if the bedrock below had very odd texture.
The view from overhead like an oxbow
As if it were a river down below.

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infernal

infernal

/ɪnˈfəːn(ə)l/
adjective
1 Relating to or characteristic of hell or the underworld.
2 informal attributive Irritating and tiresome (used for emphasis)

Origin
Late Middle English: from Old French, from Christian Latin infernalis, from Latin infernus ‘below, underground’, used by Christians to mean ‘hell’, on the pattern of inferni (masculine plural) ‘the shades’ and inferna (neuter plural) ‘the lower regions’.

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That region called infernal
Elicits a sense of nocturnal.
Though, if you there retire,
It’s thought you’ll find just fire.

With that scene in your mind
I wonder why, in matching kind,
It’s opposite, empyrean aerie,
Is also described as fiery.

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taurine

taurine

/ˈtɔːriːn/
noun
mass noun
Biochemistry
An amino acid containing sulphur and important in the metabolism of fats.
Chemical formula: NH₂CH₂CH₂SO₃H

Origin
Mid 19th century: from Greek tauros ‘bull’ (because it was originally obtained from ox bile) + -ine.

taurine2

/ˈtɔːrʌɪn/
adjective
1 Of or like a bull.
1.1 Relating to bullfighting.

Origin
Early 17th century: from Latin taurinus, from taurus ‘bull’.

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It tore us apart to realize we lost a full tureen of taurine from the lab.

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steamed

steamed

/stiːmd/
adjective

1 British informal predicative
Extremely drunk.

2 North American informal predicative
Angry; upset.

3 (of food) cooked by steaming.

Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day? Don’t get steamed, especially if you have to work tomorrow. Also, don’t be steamed if you have to work!

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ironize

ironize
(British ironise)

/ˈʌɪr(ə)nʌɪz/
verb
[with object]
Use ironically.

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It is not uncommon for the WotD sentences to ironize something or other. On the contrary, it is rare that someone lionizes me for the work.

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corporeity

corporeity

/ˌkɔːpəˈreɪɪti//ˌkɔːpəˈriːɪti/
noun
mass noun
rare
The quality of having a physical body or existence.

Origin
Early 17th century: from French corporéité or medieval Latin corporeitas, from Latin corporeus ‘composed of flesh’, from corpus, corpor- ‘body’.

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It would seem that hard-core video game enthusiasts crave an artificial existence, embedded deeply into their digital realms, taking little consideration for their actual corporeity.

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guillemet

guillemet

/ˈɡiːmeɪ//ɡijmɛ/
noun
Each of a pair of punctuation marks (« ») used as quotation marks in French and other European languages.

Origin
French, of uncertain origin; probably derived from the male forename Guillaume or the surname Guillemet.

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William (AKA Guillaume) wrote fluently in English and French. He was impeccable in his use of quotation marks when writing English dialog and likewise took care to use guillemets for French.

“Hello, friend!”
«Bonjour, mon ami!»

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alpinist

alpinist

/ˈalpɪnɪst/
noun
A climber of high mountains, especially in the Alps.

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I wonder, was Sir Edmund Hillary an alpinist before he challenged Everest?

[Wikipedia does not mention the Alps among the mountains Hillary climbed.]

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