feather

feather

/ˈfɛðə/
noun
1 Any of the flat appendages growing from a bird’s skin and forming its plumage, consisting of a partly hollow horny shaft fringed with vanes of barbs.
1.1 feathersA fringe of long hair on the legs of a dog, horse, or other animal.
verb
1 with object Rotate the blades of (a propeller) about their own axes in such a way as to lessen the air or water resistance.
1.1 Vary the angle of attack of (rotor blades).

Origin
Old English fether, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch veer and German Feder, from an Indo-European root shared by Sanskrit patra ‘wing’, Latin penna ‘feather’, and Greek pteron, pterux ‘wing’.

=====—-=====

The variety of birds’ feathers in their length and color pattern is awesome.

Image

deploy

deploy

/dɪˈplɔɪ/
verb
[with object]
1 Move (troops or equipment) into position for military action.
1.1 no object (of troops) move into position for military action.
2 Bring into effective action.

Origin
Late 18th century from French déployer, from Latin displicare and late Latin deplicare ‘unfold or explain’, from dis-, de- ‘un-’ + plicare ‘to fold’. Compare with display.

=====—=====

High command deployed mock planes and troop emplacements as a ploy to make the enemy move their real forces into the wrong place.

Image

parish

parish

noun
1 (in the Christian Church) a small administrative district typically having its own church and a priest or pastor.
1.1 British The smallest unit of local government, constituted only in rural areas.
1.2 US (in Louisiana) a territorial division corresponding to a county in other states.

Origin
Middle English from Anglo-Norman French and Old French paroche, from late Latin parochia, from Greek paroikia ‘sojourning’, based on para- ‘beside, subsidiary’ + oikos ‘dwelling’.

=====–=====

Some of the population of the local parish were particularly poorish.

Image

compel

compel

/kəmˈpɛl/
verb compels, compelling, compelled
with object and infinitive
1 Force or oblige (someone) to do something.
1.1 with object Bring about (something) by the use of force or pressure.
1.2 literary with object and adverbial of direction Force to come or go in a particular direction.

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin compellere, from com- ‘together’ + pellere ‘drive’.

=====——-=====

The twins disagreed, but neither compelled Charlene. She made her own decision which way she would go.

Image

theologian

theologian

/θɪəˈləʊdʒ(ə)n/ /θɪəˈləʊdʒɪən/
noun
A person who engages or is an expert in theology.

Origin
Late 15th century from French théologien, from théologie or Latin theologia (see theology).

=====——=====

Bob was never an expert in anything. It didn’t keep him from holding forth, as if he were a theologian.

Image

exhaust

exhaust

/ɪɡˈzɔːst/ /ɛɡˈzɔːst/
verb
[with object]
1 Make (someone) feel very tired.
2 Use up (resources or reserves) completely.
2.1 Expound on or explore (a subject or options) so fully that there is nothing further to be said or discovered.
3 Expel (gas or steam) from or into a particular place.
noun
mass noun
1 Waste gases or air expelled from an engine, turbine, or other machine in the course of its operation.
1.1 count noun The system through which exhaust gases are expelled.

Origin
Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘draw off or out’): from Latin exhaust- ‘drained out’, from the verb exhaurire, from ex- ‘out’ + haurire ‘draw (water), drain’.

=====—–=====

At home we’ve been staked.
So we’ve cooked and we’ve baked.
All the cakes have been frosted,
So now I’m exhausted.
But before I relaxes,
I must do my taxes.

Image

egomaniac

egomaniac

/ɛɡə(ʊ)ˈmeɪnɪak/ /iːɡə(ʊ)ˈmeɪnɪak/
noun
A person who is obsessively egotistical or self-centred.

=====—-=====

It was oddly heartening to read the search response, “No suitable matches were found.” when verifying that this word was available for WotD. It was good to feel that no egomaniacs are part of our beloved forum topic…until today.

Image

surplice

surplice

/ˈsəːplɪs/
noun
A loose white linen vestment varying from hip-length to calf-length, worn over a cassock by clergy and choristers at Christian church services.

Origin
Middle English from Old French sourpelis, from medieval Latin superpellicium, from super- ‘above’ + pellicia ‘fur garment’.

=====—=====

The congregation was surprised when Father John entered the service with a large coffee stain on his surplice. His sermon explained that and much more.

Image

grovel

grovel

/ˈɡrɒv(ə)l/ /ˈɡrʌv(ə)l/
verb grovels, grovelling, grovelled; US groveling, groveled
[no object]
1 Lie or crawl abjectly on the ground with one’s face downwards.
1.1 Act in an obsequious way in order to obtain someone’s forgiveness or favour.

Origin
Middle English back-formation from the obsolete adverb grovelling, from obsolete groof, grufe ‘the face or front’ (in the phrase on grufe, from Old Norse á grúfu ‘face downwards’) + the suffix -ling.

=====–=====

I won’t make you grovel
When I write my novel
About a judge named Gravel
And his ever-pounding gavel.
If you want to read it,
Just tell me that you need it.

Image