jocular

jocular

/ˈdʒɒkjʊlə/ [jock-you-lar]
adjective
Fond of or characterized by joking; humorous or playful.

Origin
Early 17th century from Latin jocularis, from joculus, diminutive of jocus (see joke).

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I considered approaching this word
Striving for a mood quite jocular.
But since no recent laughter’s been heard
I’ll just illustrate wth something more ocular.

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spark

spark

/spɑːk/ [spark] or sometimes heard in New England [spahk]
noun
1 A small fiery particle thrown off from a fire, alight in ashes, or produced by striking together two hard surfaces such as stone or metal.
1.1 An electrical discharge that ignites the explosive mixture in an internal combustion engine.
verb
1 no object Emit sparks of fire or electricity.
1.1 with object – Ignite.

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Here in the winter, with the forced hot air heat on, it is common to shock oneself or even each other because of all the manmade fibers rubbing and building up static, making tiny sparks all around the house.

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Words are a game. Sometimes I play alone, but you are welcome to play, too.

newcomer

newcomer

/ˈnjuːkʌmə/
noun
1 A person who has recently arrived in a place.
1.1 A novice in a particular activity or situation.

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It can be fun to stay up late
But morning time is really great.
Inspiring here, I must relate,
Another word for you to rate.

Far more than lurking slummers
Visiting more than in hot summers
Whether songsters or just hummers,
We seek contributing newcomers.

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sibling

sibling

/ˈsɪblɪŋ/
noun
Each of two or more children or offspring having one or both parents in common; a brother or sister.

Origin
Old English, in the sense ‘relative’ (see sib, -ling). The current sense dates from the early 20th century.

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Though the word sibling via “sib” is of unknown origin, the same cannot be said of any pair of siblings. Just ask their mother!

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(I’m sure everyone will agree, the best day to talk about twins is Tuesday.)

delight

delight

/dɪˈlʌɪt/ [dee-light]
verb
[with object]
1 Please (someone) greatly.
1.1 delight in – no object – Take great pleasure in.
noun
mass noun
1 Great pleasure.
1.1 count noun A cause or source of great pleasure.

Origin
Middle English from Old French delitier (verb), delit (noun), from Latin delectare ‘to charm’, frequentative of delicere. The -gh- was added in the 16th century by association with light.

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It snowed seven inches overnight.
I admit, to my great delight.
I’m a kid at heart, though now my toy
Is a snow blower, not the sled of a boy.

For me the forecast is good,
More snow to come. It should,
.They say, be light until lunch.
After that, it may snow a bunch.

It may be colder still tonight,
To change all that moisture to white.
So tomorrow morning, once more
The blower will down the driveway roar.

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limpid

limpid

/ˈlɪmpɪd/ [lim-pid]
adjective
1 (of a liquid) completely clear and transparent.
1.1 (of a person’s eyes) unclouded; clear.
1.2 (especially of writing or music) clear and accessible or melodious.

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin limpidus; perhaps related to lymph.

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The sun is rising in a limpid sky
Though soon thick clouds will be coming by
Filling most with a sense of dread
For the forecast of a big storm ahead.

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massive

massive

/ˈmasɪv/ [maa-siv]
adjective
1 Large and heavy or solid.
2 Exceptionally large.
2.1 Very serious.
2.2 informal – Very successful or influential.

Origin
Late Middle English from French massif, -ive, from Old French massis, based on Latin massa (see mass).

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A massive murder of crows gathered in the trees and on the ground outside the movie theater showing a retrospective of Hitchcock films.

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affluence

affluence

/ˈaflʊəns/ [aff-loo-ence]
noun
mass noun
The state of having a great deal of money; wealth.

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Comfort need not require affluence. Sharing routine, along with special, events with a loving family is the best evidence of that.

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appreciation

appreciation

/əpriːʃɪˈeɪʃ(ə)n/ /əpriːsɪˈeɪʃ(ə)n/ [uh-pree-she-ay-shun]
noun
mass noun
1 Recognition and enjoyment of the good qualities of someone or something.
1.1 Gratitude.
1.2 count noun A written assessment of an artist or piece of work, typically a favourable one.
2 A full understanding of a situation.
3 mass noun Increase in monetary value.

Origin
Late 15th century from French appréciation, from late Latin appretiatio(n-), from the verb appretiare ‘set at a price, appraise’ (see appreciate).

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Today’s a day of appreciation
All across the US nation.
For most, as well, it’s a mini vacation
Partly spent at an airport or maybe a gas station.

Whether you raise bread with yeast
Or simply bake it flat,
I wish for you “Good Harvest Feast”
Or something much like that.

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navigable

navigable

/ˈnavɪɡəb(ə)l/ [nav-ig-ubble]
adjective
1 (of a waterway or sea) able to be sailed on by ships or boats.
1.1 (of a track or road) suitable for vehicles.
2 (of a website) easy to move around in.

Origin
Early 16th century from French navigable or Latin navigabilis, from the verb navigare ‘to sail’ (see navigate).

The ranch roads were generally navigable, even without an SUV, but Joe had to get out at every gate to open it, drive through and then close it again.

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