shackle

shackle

/ˈʃak(ə)l/
noun
1 shackles – A pair of fetters connected together by a chain, used to fasten a prisoner’s wrists or ankles together.
1.1 A situation or factor that restrains or restricts someone or something.
2 A metal link, typically U-shaped, closed by a bolt, used to secure a chain or rope to something.
2.1 A pivoted link connecting a spring in a vehicle’s suspension to the body of the vehicle.

verb
[with object]
1 Chain with shackles.
1.1 Restrain; limit.

Origin
Old English sc(e)acul ‘fetter’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch schakel ‘link, coupling’.

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Only a fool will cackle
When you put him in a shackle.
If you put a few together,
They’ll dance in any weather.

They’ll jump and prance, whee!
To you entrance, see?
To any well-sung music.
It’s a truly special trick.

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grungy

grungy

/ˈɡrənjē/ /ˈɡrəndʒi/
adjective grungier, grungiest
1 informal Grimy; dirty.
2 Relating to or denoting a form of rock music characterized by a raucous guitar sound and lazy vocal delivery.
2.1 Relating to the fashion associated with grunge rock, including loose, layered clothing and ripped jeans.

Origin
1960s perhaps suggested by grubby and dingy.

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While I have no fear of dirt,
(How much can it hurt?),
There’s no need to be grungy.
Just wipe down with a sponge, see!

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(Homage to Charles Schultz character Pig-Pen from “Peanuts”)

recuperate

recuperate

/rəˈko͞opəˌrāt/ /rəˈkupəˌreɪt/
verb
1 no object Recover from illness or exertion.
2 with object Recover or regain (something lost or taken)

Origin
Mid 16th century from Latin recuperat- ‘regained’, from the verb recuperare, from re- ‘back’ + capere ‘take’.

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In the event this word is late
It’s because I wasn’t feeling great.
I took a nap and woke up late.
I shall strive, now, to recuperate
At a really, really rapid rate.

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sigil

sigil

/ˈsɪdʒɪl/
noun
1 An inscribed or painted symbol considered to have magical power.
1.1 archaic A seal.
1.2 literary A sign or symbol.

Origin
Late Middle English from late Latin sigillum ‘sign’.

Stanley spied the sigil
While silent on his vigil.
It was, to him, no shock
To see it carved in rock.

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[You might guess from the illustration that one of my favorite actors is Sigil Shepherd.]

anting

anting

/ˈantɪŋ/
noun
mass noun Ornithology
Behavior seen in some birds, in which the bird either picks up ants and rubs them on the feathers or stands with the wings spread and allows the ants to crawl over it. It is probable that the ants’ secretions help to keep the feathers in good condition.

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A sentence, I’ll forego
Because my mind’s gone slow.
A rhyme, on the other hand,
Just seems really grand.

I’m sometimes out of juice,
And need a gentle goose.
So, now that you are ranting,
Get a glimpse of anting.

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smoodge

smoodge
(also smooge)

/smuːdʒ/
verb
[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand
Behave in an ingratiating manner.
noun
mass noun informal Australian, New Zealand
Affectionate flattery.

Origin
Early 20th century probably an alteration of dialect smouch ‘kiss, sidle up to’.

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From friends it’s always huge
To get a video or verbal smoodge,
Across so many miles,
Tons of face-wide smiles.

From me to you in Australia
All across vast Asia
And through Europe’s wide regalias
Then back by Africa to the Americas.

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[Sometimes a good image is worth reusing. You’re welcome to disagree.]

wortle

wortle

/ˈwəːt(ə)l/
(also whortle)
noun
historical Metallurgy
A type of die used to reduce the thickness of metal wire, piping, etc., typically consisting of a steel plate with graduated holes in it through which metal is drawn.

Origin
Early 16th century; earliest use found in The Coventry Leet Book. Origin unknown. Perhaps compare wire and tee.

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Walter worked the wortle.
But he was merely mortal.
Yes, the wire did get thinner,
But it wasn’t done by dinner.

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[There’s an effective reference at Wikipedia…no big surprise these days.]

thallus

thallus

/ˈθaləs/
noun thalli
Botany
A plant body that is not differentiated into stem and leaves and lacks true roots and a vascular system. Thalli are typical of algae, fungi, lichens, and some liverworts.

Origin
Early 19th century from Greek thallos ‘green shoot’, from thallein ‘to bloom’.

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“You’ve got no roots,”
Said the tree, being callous
To the lichen on it’s bark,
With body called a thallus.

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jol

jol

/dʒɔːl/
noun
informal South African
An occasion of celebration and enjoyment; a good time.
verb jols, jolling, jolled
[no object] informal South African
1 with adverbial of direction Set off; go.
2 Have a good time; celebrate in a lively way.
2.1 Engage in a flirtation or a casual love affair.

Origin
Afrikaans, literally ‘party’.

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Friday night is a good opportunity to have a big jol. Doing it staring into our phone screens somehow doesn’t seem the same as usual.

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