supplement

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Word of the Day
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supplement

Pronunciation /ˈsʌplɪm(ə)nt/ /ˈsʌplɪmɛnt/ /sʌplɪˈmɛnt/
noun
1 A thing added to something else in order to complete or enhance it.
1.1 A substance taken to remedy the deficiencies in a person’s diet.
1.2 A separate section, especially a colour magazine, added to a newspaper or periodical.
1.3 A sum of money paid to increase a person’s income.
1.4 An additional charge payable for an extra service or facility.
2 Geometry
The amount by which an angle is less than 180°.

verb
[with object]
Add an extra element or amount to.

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin supplementum, from supplere ‘fill up, complete’ (see supply).

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Today, it is hoped that the image will supplement your understanding of the word of the day.

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umpire

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Word of the Day
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umpire

Pronunciation /ˈʌmpʌɪə/
noun
1 (in some sports) an official who watches a game or match closely to enforce the rules and arbitrate on matters arising from the play.
1.1 A person chosen to arbitrate between contending parties.
verb
[no object]
Act as an umpire in a game or match.

Origin
Late Middle English (originally as noumpere) (denoting an arbitrator): from Old French nonper ‘not equal’. The n was lost by wrong division of a noumpere; compare with adder.

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I rarely attempt to be an umpire, generally seeking to stretch rather than enforce the rules.

languish

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Word of the Day
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languish

Pronunciation /ˈlaŋɡwɪʃ/
verb
[no object]
1 (of a person, animal, or plant) lose or lack vitality; grow weak.
1.1 Fail to make progress or be successful.
1.2 archaic Pine with love or grief.
1.3 archaic Assume a sentimentally tender or melancholy expression or tone.
2 Be forced to remain in an unpleasant place or situation.

Origin
Middle English (in the sense ‘become faint, feeble, or ill’): from Old French languiss-, lengthened stem of languir ‘languish’, from a variant of Latin languere, related to laxus ‘loose, lax’.

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I shall willingly use my morning root canal as excuse to languish through the afternoon. (Not that a nap is uncommon for me, anyway!)

untogether

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Word of the Day
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untogether

Pronunciation /ʌntəˈɡɛðə/
adjective
informal
(of a person) not well organized or sensible.

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Untogether describes me well. Even with help, I seem to have trouble getting my act together.

Vaccination

When seeking out a vaccination
One must choose a dose location.
And often get the sinking sensation
That providers are all on vacation.

Reality is a shortage of supply,
A situation that makes me cry.
Tomorrow I’ll give another try.
For now, it’s just a heavy sigh.

limit

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Word of the Day
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limit

Pronunciation /ˈlɪmɪt/
noun
1 A point or level beyond which something does not or may not extend or pass.
1.1 often limits – The terminal point or boundary of an area or movement.
1.2 The furthest extent of one’s physical or mental endurance.
2 A restriction on the size or amount of something permissible or possible.
2.1 A speed limit.
2.2 also legal limitThe maximum concentration of alcohol in the blood that the law allows in the driver of a motor vehicle.
3 Mathematics
A point or value which a sequence, function, or sum of a series can be made to approach progressively, until they are as close to it as desired.
verb limits, limiting, limited
[with object]
Set or serve as a limit to.

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin limes, limit- ‘boundary, frontier’. The verb is from Latin limitare, from limes.

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On a road we travel frequently, there is an interesting mix of signs. The right side of the road has a standard US speed limit sign announcing a switch to 35 miles per hour. Across the road is a permanent electronic speed sign which flashes if you are going above 25 MPH, the speed limit of the road BEHIND us.

testimony

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Word of the Day
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testimony

Pronunciation /ˈtɛstɪməni/
noun testimonies
1 A formal written or spoken statement, especially one given in a court of law.
1.1 mass noun Evidence or proof of something.
1.2 A public recounting of a religious conversion or experience.
1.3 archaic A solemn protest or declaration.

Origin
Middle English from Latin testimonium, from testis ‘a witness’.

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Claire tried to provide careful and accurate testimony, even though the event in question had been months earlier. She did not wish to be seen as a witless witness.

irreverent

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Word of the Day
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irreverent

Pronunciation /ɪˈrɛv(ə)r(ə)nt/
adjective
Showing a lack of respect for people or things that are generally taken seriously.

Origin
Late Middle English from Latin irreverent- ‘not revering’, from in- ‘not’ + reverent- ‘revering’ (see reverent).

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Paul Revere, famous more for his midnight ride, displayed his silver work with pride. It would be irreverent of me to scoff at his accomplishments.

share

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Word of the Day
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share


in singular A person’s part in or contribution to something.

[[Extracted from much larger definition]]

Monday

Begin the week
As word geek:
Find a word.
Share with herd.

(Which shouts aloud,
“Not a herd, we’re a crowd!”)

Make it of the sort
For word-loving cohort.
Cook it into soup
For the entire group.