placate

placate

Pronunciation /pləˈkeɪt/ /ˈplakeɪt/ /ˈpleɪkeɪt/
verb
[with object]
Make (someone) less angry or hostile.

Origin
Late 17th century from Latin placat- ‘appeased’, from the verb placare.

==========

“I am very sorry,” said Bob, attempting to placate Betty.

ogdoad

Pronunciation /ˈɒɡdəʊad/
noun
rare
A group or set of eight.

Origin
Early 17th century via late Latin from Greek ogdoas, ogdoad-, from ogdoos ‘eighth’, from oktō ‘eight’.

========

When I stay up late
My mind goes oblate
And ogdoads are in spate.
Ain’t eight great?

cutscene

Pronunciation /ˈkʌtsiːn/
noun
(in a video game) a scene that develops the storyline and is often shown on completion of a certain level, or when the player’s character dies.

==========

Bob lacks ANY knowledge of video games, so cutscenes are purely academic to him.

chickpea

/ˈtʃɪkpiː/
noun
1 A round yellowish edible seed, widely used as a pulse.
2 The Old World plant of the pea family which bears chickpeas.
Cicer arietinum, family Leguminosae

Origin
Early 18th century (earlier as chiche-pease): from late Middle English chiche (from Old French chiche, cice, from Latin cicer ‘chickpea’) + pease.

==========

Peas or Chickpeas

If lunch or dinner is their role
It’s hard not to eat them whole
A plate’s too flat; they’ll roll!
So best put them in a bowl.

To go with your favorite cheese
I don’t know which of these
Will be the one to please
Winding up the one you seize.

adorable

Pronunciation /əˈdɔːrəb(ə)l/
adjective
Inspiring great affection or delight.

Origin
Early 17th century (in the sense ‘worthy of divine worship’): from French, from Latin adorabilis, from the verb adorare (see adore).

==========

Family pets are often adorable.

pansophy

Pronunciation /ˈpansə(ʊ)fi/
noun
historical
Universal or encyclopedic knowledge; a scheme, work, or programme attempting to embrace the whole body of human knowledge.
Chiefly with reference or allusion to Comenius’s scheme for creating a universal encyclopaedia of human knowledge.

Origin
Mid 17th century; earliest use found in Samuel Hartlib (d. ?1670). From post-classical Latin pansophia universal knowledge from ancient Greek πάνσοϕος clever in every way (from παν- + σοϕός wise) + post-classical Latin -ia.

==========

Bob was amazed to learn that pansophy had nothing to do with knowing about pots and pans.

concept

Pronunciation /ˈkɒnsɛpt/
noun
1 An abstract idea.
1.1 A plan or intention.
1.2 An idea or invention to help sell or publicize a commodity.

Origin
Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘thought, imagination’): from Latin conceptum ‘something conceived’, from Latin concept- ‘conceived’, from concipere (see conceive).

=====

Joe’s concept troubled the established companies. They worked in concert to shut him down.

Ground Cover

There is a growing sense
That I am becoming rather dense.
Inside the well-made garden fence.

Know that it has often rained
With sun, it should be explained,
And I am feeling most constrained.

Still I guess I should not shout.
But nor will I just sit and pout.
Somehow, I will work it out!

I have some rhizome tricks,
A way beneath the path of bricks.
Come spring, expect new sticks.

propensive

Pronunciation /prə(ʊ)ˈpɛnsɪv/
adjective
That has an inclination or propensity to or towards something; disposed, inclined.

Origin
Late 16th century; earliest use found in Thomas Nashe (d. c1601), writer. From classical Latin prōpēns-, past participial stem of prōpendēre propend + -ive.

==========

After some propensive anticipation, John began to read the new novel by his favorite author.