hallucinate

hallucinate

/həˈluːsɪneɪt/
verb
[no object]
1 Experience a seemingly real perception of something not actually present, typically as a result of a mental disorder or of taking drugs.
1.1 with object Experience a hallucination of (something)
with clause ‘he starts hallucinating that he is Jesus’

Origin
Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘be deceived, have illusions’): from Latin hallucinat- ‘gone astray in thought’, from the verb hallucinari, from Greek alussein ‘be uneasy or distraught’.

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Though others think him sleazy
And find he makes them queasy,
George, himself, finds it easy,
In his unstable state,
To regularly hallucinate
That he is really great!

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Mission Accomplished

Mission Accomplished

My work is now done
I built up some energy
Which came to me free
From our neighbor the sun.

Another use I’ll soon serve
To feed a young mold
Or so I’ve been told
It’s not a path from which I can swerve.

oakleaf-poem-final

Seasons

To bloom and wilt
It’s just the way
That flowers have been built.
But also made are many a seed
To fly and float away
From now’s limits they’re freed.
One season at a time
In our temperate clime
No limit of “today”.


Writing words can be an oddly interactive activity. My rhyme here is a response to a response to a response involving at least three writers.

witchhazel

Poetry is engaging and inspiring for me. Having a “conversation” of poems adds an enjoyable twist to part of my interaction with others. Blogging my rhymes here is part of the process. It is nice to get notices that someone has seen and liked a particular post.

Blogging here does not seem to engender much conversation, though. Not a complaint, just an observation. This platform seems designed for presentation of one person’s “stuff”, and I’m content with that, I guess.

This particular poetic “exchange” occurred in “The Fediverse” which is an eclectic mix of interconnected people who follow one another across the world. It’s a little bit like Twitter™, but has no corporate backing. A variety of individuals have created a network of interconnected servers which are termed “instances”. Other people choose to join an instance and set up an account at one of the servers. Then, they begin connecting with each other. The most interesting feature of the network is that I can connect not only with others on my instance, but with other people on other instances. There is not a single “hub”, so the cost of operation is spread out. Individual users choose to give the instance admin financial support. It is even possible for an individual to install the required software to run a single-user or “friends and family” instance.

There is similarity to blogging, as here on WordPress, but with “small” as a factor. It is microblogging. The typical post needs to fit in 500 characters. That makes for quicker, interactive exchanges than might be common with blogging. Less preparation, more off the cuff, more conversational.

Should you feel an urge to interact that way with me, I’m @Algot@mastodon.art. To get involved, you will need an account on a server which is part of the federated network. There are lots of them. Some, like mastodon.art where I’ve set up shop are focused and require an invitation. Writing.exchange is another focused option which might appeal to those who have followed this blog (perhaps for its rhymes).

Other instances are open for general registration. You can even start with one instance and get your bearings and then can easily migrate your account to a different server/instance.

Maybe you will enjoy a video introduction to Mastodon/The Fediverse is here: https://youtu.be/IPSbNdBmWKE (the official one) and another, a little longer one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S57uhCQBEk0

An effective way to start is to go to https://joinmastodon.org/ and look around. I also strongly recommend finding an instance other than Mastodon.social the one run by the developer of one popular fediverse server suite. There is nothing wrong with that instance. It is just huge with no particular focus. Like most instances, it has a set of rules. I think it is wise to read the rules of an instance you consider joining. Rules are social norms with which we should agree before diving into the federated network. You want to feel comfortable in the community, right?

half-and-half

half-and-half

adverb
In two equal parts.
adjective
Consisting of equal parts of one thing and another.
noun
mass noun North American
A mixture of milk and cream.

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He happily ate a half-and-half mix of hot and cold cereal on which he put half-and-half.

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jiffy

jiffy

/ˈdʒɪfi/
noun
informal in singular
A very short time; a moment.

Origin
Late 18th century of unknown origin.

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Sometimes a word of the day takes just a jiffy. Of course, the illustration might run on longer.

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practical

practical

/ˈpraktɪk(ə)l/ [prak-tih-cul]
adjective
1 Of or concerned with the actual doing or use of something rather than with theory and ideas.
2 (of an idea, plan, or method) likely to succeed or be effective in real circumstances; feasible.
2.1 Suitable for a particular purpose.
2.2 (of a person) sensible and realistic in their approach to a situation or problem.
2.3 (of a person) skilled at manual tasks.
3 So nearly the case that it can be regarded as so; virtual.
noun
British
An examination or lesson in which theories and procedures learned are applied to the actual making or doing of something.

Origin
Late 16th century from archaic practic ‘practical’ (from Old French practique, via late Latin from Greek praktikos ‘concerned with action’, from prattein ‘do, act’) + -al.

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It is good for you to practice
Well known, effective praxis.
It is also very practical
And seen as highly tactical.

Choose sticking to an axis
Falling back on praxis
Instead of veering on a slant,
Raging wildly in a rant.

Lexico gave us polyglot
To use again, we must not.
“It’s been done in threes!”
The arbiters we must please.

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imperil

imperil

/ɪmˈpɛrɪl/ /ɪmˈpɛr(ə)l/ [im-pair-ill]
verb – imperils, imperilling, imperilled; US imperiling, imperiled
[with object]
Put at risk of being harmed, injured, or destroyed.

Origin
Late Middle English from peril, probably on the pattern of endanger.

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Aloysius avoided imperiling his sanity the only way he knew how.

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contradict

contradict

/kɒntrəˈdɪkt/ [con-truh-dikt]
verb
[with object]
1 Deny the truth of (a statement) by asserting the opposite.
1.1 Assert the opposite of a statement made by (someone)
1.2 Be in conflict with.

Origin
Late 16th century from Latin contradict- ‘spoken against’, from the verb contradicere, originally contra dicere ‘speak against’.

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It is impolite to contradict a dictator.

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retrospect

retrospect

/ˈrɛtrəspɛkt/ [reh-trow-spekt]
‘noun
A survey or review of a past course of events or period of time.
Phrases
in retrospect
When looking back on a past event or situation; with hindsight.

Origin
Early 17th century from retro-‘back’, on the pattern of the noun prospect.

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Retrospect

No need for a parade
To look back on a decade.
Just look over your shoulder;
You’re now ten years older.
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