error-ridden

Word of the Day

error-ridden

adjective
Full of mistakes.

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Horace is regularly guilt-ridden because his work is prone to being error-ridden, and it gets worse at night when he is hag-ridden, commonly leading to daytime work paralysis.

incriminate

Word of the Day

incriminate

Pronunciation /ɪnˈkrɪmɪneɪt/
verb
[with object]
Make (someone) appear guilty of a crime or wrongdoing.

Origin
Mid 18th century (earlier (mid 17th century) as incrimination): from late Latin incriminat- ‘accused’, from the verb incriminare, from in- ‘into, towards’ + Latin crimen ‘crime’.

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Tony, a notorious train tagger didn’t seem to be able to avoid incriminating himself.

lorryload

Word of the Day

lorryload

Pronunciation /ˈlɒrɪləʊd/
noun
1 British An amount of something that can be carried in one lorry.
1.1 a lorryload/lorryloads of informal A large quantity or number of something.

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Lonnie and Ronnie went to help out Bonnie. They removed lorryloads of rubbish from her parents’ house after they passed.

mummer

Word of the Day

mummer

Pronunciation /ˈmʌmə/
noun
1 An actor in a traditional masked mime or a mummers’ play.
1.1 archaic, derogatory An actor in the theatre.

Origin
Late Middle English from Old French momeur, from momer ‘act in a mime’; perhaps of Germanic origin.

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Mime, My, My

Hank Hornsby was a new mummer
His first time on stage was this summer.
And he turned out to be a real hummer
Because he couldn’t have been more silent.

deference

Word of the Day

deference

Pronunciation /ˈdɛf(ə)r(ə)ns/
noun
mass noun
Polite submission and respect.

Origin
Mid 17th century from French déférence, from déférer ‘refer’ (see defer).

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Yes, I’ll write you a reference.
It will be full of pretense,
Or, at best, lots of nonsense.
But in full deference,
And if you prefer,
To our boss, I’ll gladly defer.

ceremony

Word of the Day

ceremony

Pronunciation /ˈsɛrɪməni/
noun ceremonies
1 A formal religious or public occasion, especially one celebrating a particular event, achievement, or anniversary.
1.1 An act or series of acts performed according to a traditional or prescribed form.
2 mass noun The ritual observances and procedures required or performed at grand and formal occasions.
2.1 Formal polite behaviour.

Origin
Late Middle English from Old French ceremonie or Latin caerimonia ‘religious worship’, (plural) ‘ritual observances’.

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Worldwide, televisions are tuned to the opening ceremonies of the summer Olympic Games from Tokyo, Japan.

anticipate

Word of the Day

anticipate

Pronunciation /anˈtɪsɪpeɪt/
verb
[with object]
1 Regard as probable; expect or predict.
1.1 Guess or be aware of (what will happen) and take action in order to be prepared.
1.2 Look forward to.
2 Act as a forerunner or precursor of.
2.1 Come or take place before (an event or process expected or scheduled for a later time)

Origin
Mid 16th century (in the senses ‘to take something into consideration’, ‘mention something before the proper time’): from Latin anticipat- ‘acted in advance’, from anticipare, based on ante- ‘before’ + capere ‘take’.

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For those who anticipate the arrival of the WotD post, your time is NOW!

relevant

Word of the Day

relevant
Pronunciation /ˈrɛləv(ə)nt/
adjective
1 Closely connected or appropriate to what is being done or considered.
1.1 Appropriate to the current time, period, or circumstances; of contemporary interest.

Origin
Early 16th century (as a Scots legal term meaning ‘legally pertinent’): from medieval Latin relevant- ‘raising up’, from Latin relevare.

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I suppose it is irrelevant that relevant has not been a word of focus but germane has been. Words used are theoretically random. It is a notably loose theory, of course, with the heavy thumb of the present presenter routinely in play.

Today’s pizza image is probably irrelevant, too.