March Snow

Muscles are tired
From clearing the snow.
Much more than predicted
Only when done can you really know.

We got 17 inches
midnight to eight
People driving to work
Had to go in late.

Started the clearing at six
Inside for breakfast at nine
Will this top off the season?
With that, most will be fine.

Oatmeal with coffee
And a cookie or two
I take off my boots next
In favor of a regular shoe.

Let the lingering flakes
Dust the sidewalk and stair
I’ll rest quite happily
In my most comfortable chair.

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enumerate

enumerate

/ɪˈnjuːməreɪt/
verb
[with object]
1 Mention (a number of things) one by one.
1.1 formal Establish the number of.

Origin
Early 17th century: from Latin enumerat- ‘counted out’, from the verb enumerare, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out’ + numerus ‘number’.

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“I have made several points today”, said Bob. To the dismay of his students, waiting eagerly for the bell, he enumerated them for the third time.

Classic pedagogy:

  1. Tell them what you are going to tell them.
  2. Tell them.
  3. Tell them what you told them.

If all else fails, read aloud in class the text which you wrote and sold to the students.

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oenophile

oenophile
(US enophile)

/ˈiːnə(ʊ)fʌɪl/
noun
A connoisseur of wines.

Origin
1930s: from Greek oinos ‘wine’ + -phile.

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According to the dictionary, it took until the 1930s for oenophiles to develop. Apparently, before that, people just enjoyed drinking the best wine they could find and spoke about it in their local language.

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ostensibly

ostensibly

/ɒˈstɛnsɪbli/
adverb
As appears or is stated to be true, though not necessarily so; apparently.

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Word of the Day selections are ostensibly chosen randomly. Unfortunately the algorithm used does not check for prior use of a word. Fortunately astute human intervention can prevent duplication.

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percussive

percussive

/pəˈkʌsɪv/
adjective
Relating to or produced by percussion.

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“Be original!” was the jussive command.
Don’t just use any old word at hand.
I do not intend to be rude,
But I’m certain of my verbish mood.
I like recycling as much as the next person
And I know without it our world will just worsen.
But a rule is a rule, here a very sharp tool
If I were to ignore it, I’d be a great fool.
So a new word to you I must give.
Ta-da, rat-a-tat-tat, take that: percussive.
I’ll drum it into you. Yes, you know it’s true.
It’s the thing which I must do, until you’re black and blue.

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ostensible

ostensible

/ɒˈstɛnsɪb(ə)l/
adjective
attributive Stated or appearing to be true, but not necessarily so.

Origin
Mid 18th century: from French, from medieval Latin ostensibilis from Latin ostens- ‘stretched out to view’, from the verb ostendere, from ob- ‘in view of’ + tendere ‘to stretch’.

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What you’ve said to me is ostensible,
But it may equally be reprehensible.
Though I see kids in your minivan,
I am sure it is your sneaky plan
To make it seem apparent
That you are a busy parent.
The reality may actually be
For Uber you drive them for a fee.

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plebeian

plebeian

/plɪˈbiːən/
noun
1 (in ancient Rome) a commoner.
1.1 A member of the lower social classes.
adjective
1 Of or belonging to the commoners of ancient Rome.
1.1 Of or belonging to the lower social classes.
1.2 Lacking in refinement.

Origin
Mid 16th century: from Latin plebeius (from plebs, pleb- ‘the common people’) + -an.

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In spite of protests to the contrary, the US is a society with classes. A plebeian democracy is declared, but too often those with scads of money determine the scope of legislation.

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arabica

arabica

/əˈrabɪkə/
noun
1 mass noun Coffee or coffee beans from the most widely grown coffee plant.
2 The bush that produces arabica coffee beans, native to the Old World tropics.
Coffea arabica, family Rubiaceae. See also robusta

Origin
1920s: from Latin, feminine of arabicus (see Arabic).

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Carol craves her morning coffee. When she can, she brews her own blend of 85% smooth arabica beans with fifteen percent robusta beans to give a stronger caffeine kick.

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callipygian

callipygian
(also callipygean)

/ˌkalɪˈpɪdʒɪən/
adjective
rare
Having well-shaped buttocks.

Origin
Late 18th century: from Greek kallipūgos (used to describe a famous statue of Venus), from kallos ‘beauty’ + pūgē ‘buttocks’, + -ian.

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To loosely apply a common aphorism: “[That which is] callipygian is in the eye of the beholder.”

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