aeolian

aeolian
(US eolian)

/iːˈəʊlɪən/
adjective
Geology
Relating to or arising from the action of the wind.

Origin
Early 17th century: from the name Aeolus + -ian.

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Arnold gazed at the aeolian waves arranged in the desert sand by the fluid we call air instead of water.

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radicle

radicle

/ˈradɪk(ə)l/
noun
Botany
1 The part of a plant embryo that develops into the primary root.
1.1 Anatomy A rootlike subdivision of a nerve or vein.

Origin
Late 17th century: from Latin radicula, diminutive of radix, radic- ‘root’.

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Bob created an illustration of a dissected bean to show they typical parts of a dicot seed including cotyledons and the embryo with it’s radicle and first leaves ready to germinate.

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Wunderkammer

Wunderkammer

/ˈvʊndəˌkamə/
noun
A place where a collection of curiosities and rarities is exhibited.

Origin
German, literally ‘wonder chamber’.

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Over the years, Mark managed to make his science classroom into a Wunderkammer, a mini museum. He built his own display cases and wrote description cards for each new acquisition. Students from all around the school stopped in after school to gaze and ask questions.

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scroggin

scroggin

/ˈskrɒɡɪn/
noun
mass noun
NZ, Australian

A mixture of dried fruit, nuts, and other food eaten as a snack by hikers.

Origin
1940s: of unknown origin.

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Beef jerky and scroggin would be the main diet for the next several days. There was no hike, no need for trail mix, just an abundance of the stuff given to him as Christmas presents.

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frankincense

frankincense

/ˈfraŋkɪnsɛns/
noun
mass noun
An aromatic gum resin obtained from an African tree and burnt as incense.
This resin is obtained from the tree Boswellia sacra, family Burseraceae, native to Somalia
Also called olibanum, gum olibanum

Origin
Late Middle English: from Old French franc encens, literally ‘high-quality incense’, from franc (see frank) in an obsolete sense ‘superior, of high quality’ (which also existed in English) + encens ‘incense’.

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Frankincense
Wafting scents
Best intents
Gifts intense.

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bilbo

bilbo

/ˈbɪlbəʊ/
noun
A sword used in former times, noted for the temper and elasticity of its blade.

Origin
Mid 16th century: from Bilboa, an earlier English form of the name Bilbao, noted for the manufacture of fine blades.

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The bilbo used by Henry’s multi-great grandfather hung above the mantle. It was a prized possession which he maintained in peak condition.

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[Please note: Henry’s great-great… was not Bilbo Baggins.]

griff

griff

/ɡrɪf/
noun
mass noun
dated, informal
News or reliable information.

Origin
Late 19th century: abbreviation of the slang term griffin ‘a betting tip’, of unknown origin.

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I don’t want the spin.
I do not need your slant.
No wink or little grin.
No sanctimonious cant.

Just dish me out the griff.
“The straight dope” will do fine.
“The skinny”, not a riff.
“Fake news” is not mine!

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injurious

injurious

/ɪnˈdʒʊərɪəs/
adjective
1 Causing or likely to cause damage or harm.
1.1 (of language) maliciously insulting; libellous.

Origin
Late Middle English: from French injurieux or Latin injuriosus, from injuria ‘a wrong’ (see injury).

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The WotD is intended to inform, enlighten and perhaps even entertain. It is never the plan to be injurious, or to make you furious, just at worst, to make you curious.

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troika

troika

/ˈtrɔɪkə/
noun
1 A Russian vehicle pulled by a team of three horses abreast.
1.1 A team of three horses for a troika.
2 A group of three people working together, especially in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Origin
Russian, from troe ‘set of three’.

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Terry traveled untroubled on his troika across the snowy tundra.

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forbidden

forbidden

/fəˈbɪd(ə)n/
adjective
1 Not allowed; banned.

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Magic was forbidden,
Forcing it to go hidden.
However things are bright
It remains in plain sight.
Masked as simple music
With dancing, slow and quick.

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