cordwainer

cordwainer

/ˈkɔːdweɪnə/
noun
archaic
A shoemaker (still used in the names of guilds)

Origin
Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French cordewaner, from Old French cordewan, ‘of Cordoba’ (see cordovan).

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Alec aspired to be a cordwainer. He settled for becoming a shoe designer and shoemaker so he could be, at least, contemporary, if not avant garde.

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jogtrot

jogtrot

/ˈdʒɒɡtrɒt/
noun
A slow trot.

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After an initial slow advance, the troops broke into a jogtrot, spreading the ranks, just before the cry, “CHARGE!”

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precursor

precursor

/prɪˈkəːsə/
noun
1 A person or thing that comes before another of the same kind; a forerunner.
1.1 A substance from which another is formed, especially by metabolic reaction.

Origin
Late Middle English: from Latin praecursor, from praecurs- ‘preceded’, from praecurrere, from prae ‘beforehand’ + currere ‘to run’.

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I hope it will not come as a surprise that the precursor is the one who arrives first. In a race that person is called the “winner”.

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When you’re seeking grace,
There’s no need to chase
Or be the one in first place.
Finding grace is not a race.

rebozo

rebozo

/rɪˈbəʊzəʊ/
noun
A long scarf covering the head and shoulders, traditionally worn by Spanish-American women.

Origin
Spanish.

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Maria maintained her composure. Wearing the rebozo was tradition. Hoots from the muchachos didn’t matter.

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scripophily

scripophily

/skrɪˈpɒfɪli/
noun
mass noun
1 The collection of old bond and share certificates as a pursuit or hobby.
1.1 Old bond and share certificates collectively.

Origin
1970s: from scrip + -phily.

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I hold no bond or certificate
Cannot participate in scripophily.
It’s with cash alone I participate.
To claim otherwise would just be silly.

I fold a meager stack of bills
And put them in my pocket.
(It is one of my finer skills.)
Mostly they disappear like a rocket.

In case you really wonder.
I beg you to consider,
Following my path’s a blunder
Really, I’m no kidder!

Far better to have a rich daddy.
Who left you a big trust.
And gives you cash gladly
Unless the market suddenly goes bust.

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Words are a game. Sometimes I play alone, but you are welcome to play, too.

adust

adust

adjective
archaic
1 Scorched; burnt.
2 Gloomy; melancholic.

Origin
Late Middle English: from French aduste or Latin adustus ‘burnt’, from adurere, from ad ‘to’ (as an intensifier) + urere ‘to burn’.

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It will not come as a surprise that by the end of the day, I’ll be a bit adust. Our road trip will be over.

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impresario

impresario

/ˌɪmprɪˈsɑːrɪəʊ/
noun
1 A person who organizes and often finances concerts, plays, or operas.
1.1 historical The manager of a musical, theatrical, or operatic company.

Origin
Mid 18th century: from Italian, from impresa ‘undertaking’.

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Max impressed the theater company’s impresario, gaining a spot in the cast.

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Road Trip

road trip

a journey by car, bus etc.

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The road trip continues today. too little WiFi for a new illustration. Recycling an old one is good, too.

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Afternoon extra, after arriving at the day’s destination. The WiFi is better and the chair is much more comfortable at a wide desk.
It has been argued that “road trip” is TWO words. This is true, but in the U.S., it is almost used as a single word. The U.S. is a country of drivers. We are generally allowed to take our license test between the 16 and 17th birthdays and for years, the Ford Mustang or another “muscle car” was most people’s dream. My dream (met long ago) was a motorcycle. When the need came along for a family-friendly vehicle, that motorcycle had to go, but as I approached retirement and also since retirement, I’ve upgraded to a pickup truck, one capable of taking three extra back seat passengers as long as their legs are NOT long.
The pages of a road atlas are almost as good as individual state maps with the added ease of closing the atlas neatly without needing to do an accordion fold job.

preverbal

preverbal

/priːˈvəːb(ə)l/
adjective
1 Existing or occurring before the development of speech.
2 Grammar
Occurring before a verb.

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“Waaah! Waaah!”, exclaimed young Charles, clearly elucidating his position on the current state of his diapers. Mom and Dad strained to understand his preverbal commentary.
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