anting

anting

/ˈantɪŋ/
noun
mass noun Ornithology
Behavior seen in some birds, in which the bird either picks up ants and rubs them on the feathers or stands with the wings spread and allows the ants to crawl over it. It is probable that the ants’ secretions help to keep the feathers in good condition.

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A sentence, I’ll forego
Because my mind’s gone slow.
A rhyme, on the other hand,
Just seems really grand.

I’m sometimes out of juice,
And need a gentle goose.
So, now that you are ranting,
Get a glimpse of anting.

Image

smoodge

smoodge
(also smooge)

/smuːdʒ/
verb
[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand
Behave in an ingratiating manner.
noun
mass noun informal Australian, New Zealand
Affectionate flattery.

Origin
Early 20th century probably an alteration of dialect smouch ‘kiss, sidle up to’.

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From friends it’s always huge
To get a video or verbal smoodge,
Across so many miles,
Tons of face-wide smiles.

From me to you in Australia
All across vast Asia
And through Europe’s wide regalias
Then back by Africa to the Americas.

Image

[Sometimes a good image is worth reusing. You’re welcome to disagree.]

wortle

wortle

/ˈwəːt(ə)l/
(also whortle)
noun
historical Metallurgy
A type of die used to reduce the thickness of metal wire, piping, etc., typically consisting of a steel plate with graduated holes in it through which metal is drawn.

Origin
Early 16th century; earliest use found in The Coventry Leet Book. Origin unknown. Perhaps compare wire and tee.

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Walter worked the wortle.
But he was merely mortal.
Yes, the wire did get thinner,
But it wasn’t done by dinner.

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[There’s an effective reference at Wikipedia…no big surprise these days.]

thallus

thallus

/ˈθaləs/
noun thalli
Botany
A plant body that is not differentiated into stem and leaves and lacks true roots and a vascular system. Thalli are typical of algae, fungi, lichens, and some liverworts.

Origin
Early 19th century from Greek thallos ‘green shoot’, from thallein ‘to bloom’.

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“You’ve got no roots,”
Said the tree, being callous
To the lichen on it’s bark,
With body called a thallus.

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Saturday’s Story

An aftermath of snow?
We’ve nothing here to show.
It’s cold outside now, though,
And we expect the wind to blow.

We hear there’ll be some sun
So we can plan for fun
Once some landscaping is done
We might go out and run…

Well maybe not that far
Perhaps just to the car.
We’ve errands, hardy, har!
To get pills in a jar.

And, yes, since you have asked.
We will go out well masked.
That’s how we’ve been tasked.
In the governor’s daily telecasts.

jol

jol

/dʒɔːl/
noun
informal South African
An occasion of celebration and enjoyment; a good time.
verb jols, jolling, jolled
[no object] informal South African
1 with adverbial of direction Set off; go.
2 Have a good time; celebrate in a lively way.
2.1 Engage in a flirtation or a casual love affair.

Origin
Afrikaans, literally ‘party’.

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Friday night is a good opportunity to have a big jol. Doing it staring into our phone screens somehow doesn’t seem the same as usual.

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yeuch

yeuch

/jɪəx/ /jɪˈəːx/ /jiːʌx/
(US – Yuck)
exclamation
informal
Expressing disgust or strong distaste.

Origin
1970s imitative.

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The Brits say “yeuch” while we Yanks say “yuck”. Either way, it’s a great way to express distaste.

As we both retch,
We will not kvetch.
We won’t be dwelling
On the spelling.

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Upheval

When our lives must pivot,
Can’t just replace the divot.

In this moment which is strange
Our lives must go through change.

If today, there is no sorrow,
That might change tomorrow.

So now we look ahead
And might do so with dread.

Because of the pandemic
Change will be systemic.

Since these events our lives stir,
We cannot *know* the future.

Still, as for sense we grope,
There’s always room for hope.

Process

Rhymes come in a series
As if my mind had theories.
Just a stanza at a time
Not many in a line.

Now you may find them vapid
And think they come too rapid.
Can’t control how you’ll react
With you, can’t make a pact.

The words just have a flow,
I don’t know where they’ll go.
The outcome you can see
‘Cause here, I set them free.